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ResourceList

List 1 Texts – Current Texts

SubjectTitle
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeIn the End it is Harder to Know Who is the Greater Victim.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV Part 1 explores the power of the past over the present. Discuss.
English Year 12, StasilandStasiland Shows the Effect Too Much Structure and Surveillance Has on the Human Spirit.
English Year 12, StasilandStasiland is a Powerful Critique of Humanity’s Inability to Deal with Unpleasant Realities.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeIn Margaret Atwood’s Cats Eye, Elaine Risley, the protagonist takes the reader to a conventional flashback that tells a psychological story, a defensive denial and the consequences of having to deal with the past.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeIn Margaret Atwood’s 1988 Cat’s Eye, Elaine Risley takes the reader through a conventional flashback that tells a psychological story, a defensive denial and the consequences of having to deal with the past.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeIn Margaret Atwood’s 1988 Cat’s Eye, Elaine Risley takes the reader through a conventional flashback that tells a psychological story, a defensive denial and the consequences of having to deal with the past.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeIn Margaret Atwood’s 1988 Cat’s Eye, Elaine Risley takes the reader through a conventional flashback that tells a psychological story, a defensive denial and the consequences of having to deal with the past.
English Year 12, StasilandAs Well as Being the Author, What Role Does Funder Herself Play in ‘Stasiland’?
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeMemories form an integral element in Margaret Atwood’s 1980′s novel, ‘Cat’s Eye’.
English Year 12, Stasiland‘The Past Can Never Be Forgotten, it Affects Our Present and Our Future.’ To What Extent Do You Think This is True?
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeWhat Cat’s Eye Articulates is the Complexity of Being a Human Being.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeElaine Must Confront Her Past Before Embracing the Present and the Future.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeThe True tension in Atwood’s Novel is in the Relationship Between a Victim and a Tormenter. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeElaine’s Worst Fault is That She Never Takes Control of Her Life; She is Always the victim. Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Cat’s Eye‘Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise’. Does Elaine ever truly find herself?’
English Year 12, The War PoemsWilfred Owen: ‘My subject is War, and pity of War.’ How does Owen explore this subject in his poetry?
English Year 12, StasilandStasiland Examines the Impact on People When Rights Are Not Considered. Discuss.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeElaine’s adult personality reflects her childhood experiences. Do you agree or disagree with this statement?
English Year 12, StasilandDoes Telling Their Stories Free or Fetter Funder’s Subjects?
English Year 12, CloudstreetA Play Prepared to Reflect on Good, Evil, Chance, Fate and the Mystery of Things.’ To What Extent is This an Accurate Representation of the Play?
English Year 12, StasilandStasiland Character Analysis
English Year 12, BrooklynEilis Rarely Takes Charge of Her Life. Discuss.
English Year 12, BrooklynBrooklyn is Not a Novel About Migration, it is About Self-Identity. Discuss.
English Year 12, In the Country of MenBetrayal is Not Always the Work of an Unethical Person. Discuss.
English Year 12, In the Country of MenIn the Country of Men – Chapter 8 Questions & Answers
English Year 12, The War PoemsWhat Messages About War does Owen Try to Convey to His Audience?
English Year 12, StasilandAs Well as Being the Author, What Role Does Funder Herself Play in ‘Stasiland’?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IText Response – King Henry
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IAlthough Henry IV wishes his kingdom to ‘march all one way’, it is hopelessly divided. Discuss.
English Year 12, StasilandDoes Funder Find Stories of Human Courage?
English Year 12, StasilandIntensive Chapter Notes/Quotes/Analysis
English Year 12, Cat’s Eye‘Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space’. Is this the point Elaine is trying to make in the novel? Discuss.
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsTo What Extent is Revenge More Important than Love for Heathcliff?
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsEmily Bronte’s Multiple Narrators are Astonishingly Effective. Discuss.
English Year 12, Wuthering Heights‘He’s not a rough diamond. He’s a fierce, pitiless, wolfish man.’ Is Catherine’s description and adequate representation of Heathcliff?
English Year 12, Stasiland‘The Power of Stasiland comes as much from Funder’s depiction of physical places as from the word of those she meets.’ Is this how you see Stasiland?
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsAs a Fallible Narrator, Nelly Dean Alters the Course of the Story. Is She Completely Blameless in What Occurs?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV Explores the Struggle Between Vice and Virtue.
English Year 12, Selected Poems (Harwood)Gwen Harwood Poetry Analysis
English Year 12, The War PoemsIdeas in Wilfred Owen’s War Poems
English Year 12, The War PoemsWhat warnings and implied criticisms are evident in Owen’s poetry?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘So shaken are we, so wan with care.’ To what extent are King Henry’s worries diminished by the end of the play?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘With three of four loggerheads amongst three of four score hogsheads. I have sounded the very base-string of humility.’Hal is portrayed as a callous and manipulative character who does not deserve our respect. To what extent do you agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘Although Hal’s development is the dramatic driving force of the play, it is Hotspur who attracts the audience’s attention.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IPart of the conflict between Prince Hal and his father is becuase they are so similar. Do you agree?
English Year 12, The War Poems‘It is hard to say who or what is the greatest enemy in the poetry of Wilfred Owen, for his bitterness is directed at more than one target.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV Explores the Consequences of Ambition.
English Year 12, BrooklynIf We Are to Understand Ourselves Then We Must Look Around Us.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IDespite His Many Negative Qualities, Falstaff is the Most Appealing Character in the Play. Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHal is Surrounded By Figures Who Influence His Development. From Whom Does He Learn Most?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV Explores Different Versions of Honour.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IIn Henry IV, All the Characters Suffer Due to Their Own Selfishness and Conceit. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IKing Henry IV is a Failure as King. Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IThe Comic Role of Falstaff is Used to Highlight the More Serious Concerns of the Play. Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IWhat Does Henry IV Suggest About the Nature of War?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IFalstaff drives the humour of the play more than its moral compass. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHow does what happens outside the court comment upon what happens within the court?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘The play presents so many conflicting ideas about honour. What are these and how are they depicted?’
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IIn Henry IV Part 1, personal affection counts for less than duty. Discuss
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IThe play shows the disorder and conflict that result when society’s rulers are driven by greed and ambition. Discuss.
English Year 12, Cat’s Eye‘Another belief of mine is that everyone is an adult, whereas I am merely a child.’ Does Elaine ever truly find herself?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IIn Henry IV Part 1 Shakespeare suggests that it is important to find a balance between royalty and humaity. To what extent do you agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHal Shows a Readiness to Use Other People as a Means to His Own Ends’. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHotspur Has Boundless Courage But Lacks the Political Acumen to be a Serious Threat to the Throne.
English Year 12, BrooklynComparisons in Brooklyn
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHal is the Politician and Hotspur is the Man of Action. To What Extent Do You Agree? Discuss.
English Year 12, StasilandThe Characters in Stasiland Are Not Really Survivors. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘Though a comic play, Henry IV Part I conveys Shakespeare’s serious concerns about war and rulers’ Discuss
English Year 12, The War PoemsHow Does Owen Capture the Reality of War?
English Year 12, The War Poems‘The loss from war is always a disturbing presence in Owen’s Poems.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, BrooklynEilis’ Biggest Weakness is her Duty to Please Others.
English Year 12, BrooklynDoes Eillis’ Return to Brooklyn Represent a Hard-Won Self-Awareness?
English Year 12, BrooklynIs Brooklyn About the Experience of Migration?
English Year 12, BrooklynBrooklyn Shows That Family is More Than Independence. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IFalstaff is the True Hero of the Play.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IIt is the minor characters who add to the messages of Henry IV Part 1.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeElaine Must Confront Her Past Before She Can Embrace the Present and the Future.
English Year 12, Selected Poems (Harwood)Harwood both celebrates and condemns women’s roles in society. Do you agree?
English Year 12, Selected Poems (Harwood)Harwood’s poetry focuses heavily on childhood memories. Discuss.
English Year 12, Selected Poems (Harwood)How do Harwood’s poems highlight the repression of females within society?
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsOur Expectations Are Often Shaped By Others
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IShakespeare’s Henry IV Part 1 is a critique on the role of honour. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IWe may enjoy Falstaff but we cannot admire him.
English Year 12, StasilandJulia tells Funder: ‘For anyone to understand a regime like the GDR, the stories of ordinary people must be told.’ How does Funder tell the stories or ordinary people?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV Part 1 mixes poetry and prose to a significant degree. Why did Shakespeare choose to write the play in this way?
English Year 12, Stasiland‘I think about the feeling I’ve developed for the former GDR horror-romance’. Despite the horrors of the hidden world Funder uncovers, ultimately her tale is one of triumph.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IIn Henry IV Part 1, personal affection counts for less than duty. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV Part 1 does not explicitly direct the audience to prefer either Falstaff’s or Hotspur’s attitude to honour. To what extent is this true?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IWhat do the different worlds in Henry IV Part 1 reveal about the characters in the play?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV Part 1 deals with the contrast between what people may appear to be and what they are. Discuss.
English Year 12, Cat’s Eye‘Cat’s Eye’ Shows the Lasting Impact of Childhood Experiences On Life. Discuss.
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeAll Aspects of Elaine’s Life Are Influenced By Her Childhood.
English Year 12, StasilandStasiland is a Story of Courage. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IAlthough Henry IV Part 1 shows triumph over rebellion, the play’s greater interest lies in the world of disorder. Discuss.
English Year 12, CloudstreetLife can be a war, each day is filled with conflict and at times it is difficult to keep your head ‘above water’.
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsPassage Analysis – Lockwood’s Dream
English Year 12, The Complete MausAn Extended Chapter Analysis
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘Hotspur has boundless courage and energy but he lacks the political acumen to be a serious threat to the throne.’ To what extent does this reflect your understanding of the play?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘Prince Hal is the politician while Hotspur is the man of action.’ To what extent do you agree with this interpretation of the play?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IIn Henry IV, Part 1, the ability to master language and don appropriate masks is a marker of an effective leader. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV, Part 1 shows that the ability to manipulate others is the key to successful leadership. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IPrince Hal navigates a path between the excesses of Falstaff and Hotspur, thereby preparing himself to be the ideal future king. Discuss.
English Year 12, StasilandFunder is more than a detached storyteller in Stasiland.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IFalstaff is the true hero of the play. Discuss.
English Year 12, Cat’s Eye‘Cat’s Eye’ Shows the Consequences of Ignoring the Past. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHow does Henry IV Part One explore the value of honour?
English Year 12, Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?It is the inability of Carver’s characters to effectively communicate that causes the most damage.
English Year 12, Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?Beneath their ordinary lives, Carver’s characters are complex beyond measure.
English Year 12, Stasiland‘Suddenly the landscape seems crowded with victims.’ How have the female characters of Stasiland been portrayed as victims?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘As if he mastered there a double spirit of teaching and learning instantly.’ From whom does Hal learn and what does he teach?
English Year 12, StasilandFunder’s interviews with former Stasi informers indicate that many have consciences untroubled by what they did to others. Discuss.
English Year 12, StasilandDespite the horrors of the hidden world Funder uncovers, ultimately her tale is one of triumph.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘What is honour? A Word. What is in that word honour? What is that honour? Air.’ To what extent do you agree with Falstaff’s view of honour in the play?
English Year 12, The War Poems‘Wilfred Owen believed he had the responsibility to give the ordinary soldier a voice’. How did he achieve this in his poetry?
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeElaine’s Retrospective Exhibition Forces Her to Control Her Past, Present and Future. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IDiscuss Hal’s Transformation in the Context of ‘Henry IV, Part 1.’
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IWhat Do the Characters in ‘Henry IV Part 1′ Suggest About Honour and Its Limitations?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IWhat Does ‘Henry IV Part 1′ Suggest About the Nature of Kingship?
English Year 12, The War Poems‘The power of Owen’s poetry lies in the synthesis between realism and romantic depictions.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, The War Poems‘Owen’s Poems reveals tenderness and compassion towards those who lives have been destroyed by the war.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, The War Poems‘The Poems condemn those who encourage young men to go to war.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IWhat Role Does Deception Play in ‘Henry IV Part 1′?
English Year 12, The War Poems‘My subject is War, and the pity of War.’ How does Owen explore this subject in his poetry?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘Falstaff has nothing in him that can be esteemed.’ Do you agree with this assessment ofSir John Falstaff?
English Year 12, The War Poems‘Anger and compassion combine in Wilfred Owen’s poetry to create an unforgettable impression.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, The War Poems‘The role of a poet is to provoke discussion.’ In what ways is this true of Wilfred Owen?
English Year 12, The War Poems‘Wilfred Owen is not so much a war poet, but an anti-war poet.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, The Complete MausTo What Extent are Vladek’s Personality Traits a Pitiable Product of His Experiences During the Holocaust?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IShakespeare’s Henry IV: Part 1 is a critique of the role of honour and duty in a changing world. Discuss.
English Year 12, StasilandThe victims in Stasiland suffer from Mauer im Kopf. To what extent do you agree?
English Year 12, StasilandHow Does Anna Funder’s Characterisations Position Readers to View the Characters?
English Year 12, The War PoemsWilfred Owen is an ‘original and unforgettable poet’ with a ‘deep and unaffected compassion’. Do you agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHow Important is Deception in ‘Henry IV part one?’
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeArt is Enhanced by Trauma. Is This True of ‘Cat’s Eye’?
English Year 12, Cat’s Eye‘Sometimes this comes to the surface, sometimes that, sometimes nothing.” How do things ‘come to the surface’ when Elaine returns to Toronto?
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeTo What Extent Have Cruelty and Kindness Shaped the Relationships in ‘Cat’s Eye’?
English Year 12, Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?Carver’s stories position readers to feel more disdain for his characters than empathy. How?
English Year 12, Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?Carver’s characters are plagued by their inaction and by others. Discuss.
English Year 12, Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?‘The men in Carver’s stories are weak, lonely and ultimately disorientated.’ Discuss
English Year 12, The War PoemsWilfred Owen Captured the Truth of War in His Poetry. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IThough Falstaff’s Antics Are Humorous, His Significance in ‘Henry IV, Part I’ Extends Beyond Comic Relief. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IShakespeare’s ‘King Henry IV part one’ Explores What it Means to be an Honest and Honourable Man.
English Year 12, Cat’s Eye‘Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise’. Does Elaine truly ever find herself?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHow Does Shakespeare Convey the Challenges of Leadership in ’1 Henry IV’?
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsWuthering Heights Discussion
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsWuthering Heights Discussion
English Year 12, Cat’s EyeCat’s Eye Discussion
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsWuthering Heights, meaning ‘to blow fiercely’, not only sets the scene for the wild and reckless relationships in the novel, but also evokes a sense of mystery and isolation.
English Year 12, The Complete MausMaus is a Novel About the Baggage We Carry.
English Year 12, The Complete MausMaus Is A Novel About The Baggage We Carry
English Year 12, Wuthering Heights‘Wuthering Heights’ Explores a Brutal World in Which the Forces of Nature Are Unforgiving and Humans Are Exposed to Correspondingly Harsh Social Realities. Discuss.
English Year 12, Stasiland‘Anna is not an objective observer, but this is not a problem. Her subjectivity enhances the impact of Stasiland.’ Discuss the narrative point of view in Stasiland.
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsIn Wuthering Heights, the Extraordinary Passion Between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw Dominates the Entire Novel.’ Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Wuthering Heights‘The Role of Supernatural in ‘Wuthering Heights’ is Secondary to the Narrative.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsEmily Bronte’s Multiple Narratives Are Astonishingly Effective.
English Year 12, Wuthering Heights‘Although Heathcliff is Powerful and Mysterious, it is Catherine Who Evokes Sympathy.’ Discuss.
English Year 12, Selected Poems (Harwood)Ageing, Death, Mortality and the Transience of Life
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHenry IV is Dominated By Characters That Use Others to Further Their Own Agenda.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHow Does Henry IV Explore Contrasting Notions of Honour?
English Year 12, Selected Poems (Harwood)Memory and the Changing Self
English Year 12, Selected Poems (Harwood)Nature/Music Theme
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘Despite His Substantial Flaws, Falstaff Has Much to Offer the Young Hal.’ Do You Agree?
English Year 12, The War PoemsAnger and Bitterness Suffuse Owen’s War Poetry. Discuss.
English Year 12, The War PoemsWilfred Owen Draws Upon His Personal Experiences to Shatter the Heroic Illusion.
English Year 12, The War PoemsOwen Assaults the Reader’s Senses With the Reality of Trench Warfare. How Does He Achieve This?
English Year 12, The War PoemsReferring to Dulce et Decorum est pro Patria mori and any other two poems, discuss Owen’s use of irony.
English Year 12, The War PoemsOwen Was Deeply Concerned With the Techniques and Aesthetics of Poetry Writing. Discuss.
English Year 12, The War PoemsOwen’s War Poems Expose the Divergence Between the Reality and Perception of the Fighting in World War One. Discuss.
English Year 12, The War PoemsThe War is Not the Only Concern in Owen’s Poetry.
English Year 12, Wuthering HeightsNarrative Perspective and Structure
English Year 12, Selected Poems (Harwood)Harwood’s Use of Rhyme, Rhythm and Sound Intensifies Her Critique of Social Institutions Such As Marriage, Motherhood, School and Church.
English Year 12, The War PoemsWar Poems Notes
English Year 12, The War PoemsOwen’s Poetry is About Suffering.
English Year 12, The War PoemsThere is No Hope in Owen’s Poetry. To What Extent is This True?
English Year 12, StasilandAnna Funder Constructs a Black and White View of Victims and Perpetrators in ‘Stasiland’. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Year 12, StasilandExplain what Funder thinks is right and wrong, good and bad about: East Germany’s new society since the fall of the Berlin Wall, the old GDR society with the Berlin Wall and her own Australian society. Do you share her assumptions?
English Year 12, In the Country of MenThe Novel Argues That Suleiman Should Not Be Forgiven For His Actions.
English Year 12, StasilandIt is Through Her Characters That Funder Reveals Her Attitudes to the GDR. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part I‘Unlike Hal, Hotspur is Unable to Change.’ Do You Agree?
English Year 12, StasilandWho is the Narrator? How Does the Narrative Voice Shape the Information Conveyed About East Germany in the Past and Present.
English Year 12, The Complete MausThe Story of Maus Could Only Have Been Told as a Graphic Novel. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IAlthough Henry IV, Part 1 Shows Triumph Over Rebellion, the Play’s Greater Interest Lies in the World of Disorder. Discuss.
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IHow Does Shakespeare Use the Contrasting Groups of Characters to Explore the Qualities of a Successful Ruler?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IThe Comic Role of Falstaff is Used to Highlight the More Serious Concerns of the Play. Do You Agree?
English Year 12, Henry IV, Part IIt is the Minor Characters Who Add to the Messages of Henry IV, Part 1. Discuss.
English Year 12, StasilandHow Does Anna Funder’s Characterisations Position Readers to View the Characters?
English Year 12, StasilandStasiland is a Story of Courage. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Year 12, StasilandThe Characters in Stasiland Are Not Really Survivors. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Year 12, In the Country of MenWomen Have More Power Than Men in the Novel.



List 1 Texts – Previous Texts

SubjectTitle
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘Dickens uses the setting of ‘A Christmas Carol’ to add complexity to the characters and evoke empathy and guilt.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Girl With a Pearl EarringBelonging strengthens identity, rather than challenging it.
English Previous Curriculum, The Great GatsbyThe Great Gatsby is a devastating analysis of the ‘foul dust’ that floats in the wake of the American Dream. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, American BeautyBeing ourselves is difficult in the face of pressure from society’s expectations, but maintaining a false is even more difficult. Discuss, referring to the characters in American Beauty.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolThe effect of A Christmas Carol lies in the contrast that Dickens manages to create through the characters and through the language.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontIt is Terry’s anger that leads him to testify against Johnny, and not his newly awakened conscience. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront demonstrates that collective action depends on the courage and conviction of a few individuals. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Great GatsbyHow does the novel show that behind the glamour of the world in which Gatsby moves lie forces that are shallow and destructive?
English Previous Curriculum, The Colour of Water‘The colour of water’ is an unforgettable memoir written by James McBride, as a tribute to his white mother, Ruth McBride Jordan.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront is foremost a serious film. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront is foremost a love story. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Father Barry and Edie are the means by which Terry Malloy becomes the ‘contender” he had always wanted to be”.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘I coulda been somebody a contender’. Terry Malloy’s transformation from aimless ‘bum’ to whistleblower means that in the end he really did ‘become someone’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘For the hour in which I can lose myself in someone else’s thoughts is the greatest relief I can find from the burden of my own memories’. Anna’s apparent selflessness is merely a ruse for a form of escapism.” Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘The plague destroys one world and replaces it with another
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist: I knew in my senior year that I was something special. How is Changez affected by this realisation?’
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolDickens uses many minor characters throughout his tale. To what ends do these characters aid to Scrooge’s transformation and the portrayal of the story. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Do it to them before they do it to you’ Discuss how Terry’s character is transformed through the film.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Malouf’s use of language and imagery in Ransom shows the value of appreciating what is around is every day.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIt is the style of the novel Ransom which gives it such resonance.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomRansom depicts a determinedly male world, where the women are only incidental characters. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomRansom is a novel of fathers and sons. What is being revealed about the pressures of both parenting and growing up?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomDiscuss the significance of story and storytelling in Ransom.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘Despite being out of practise, it was a marvellous laugh’. Humour is a central aspect of ‘A Christmas Carol’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘Everyone has a right to look after themselves, he always did’. How does Dickens show that a selfish life is an unsatisfactory life
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolMore than anything it is fear that causes Scrooge to change. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersIn ‘Year of Wonders’, the plague brings out the best in some and the worst in others. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘The crisis of identity exposed in the novel is not resolved.’ To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolIt is not enough for Scrooge to be told what he needs to know. He must see it. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love StoriesYou are a white man’s hunter now, Antonio, You carry a gun, you carry the fear.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersHow does Brooks’ develop a sense of time and of place in this novel?
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love StoriesThe Gods have accepted you Antonio Bolivar.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘The novel suggests that the women in the novel are powerless and men hold all the power. Do you agree?’
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolA ‘Christmas Carol’ suggests there are different kinds of poverty.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘We had been stripped bare indeed’. What vulnerabilities are exposed)by the Plague in Eyam?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWhat role does love play in Ransom?
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethA written piece on the theme ambition
English Previous Curriculum, MontanaAn essay about patriarchic society
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenHumans must suppress all emotions and use only reason and logic when making decisions that are ‘fair’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront suggests that most people prefer security to justice. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroNeither Paul nor Keller gets the life he expects. Is Maestro primarily a study of disappointment and loss?
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroNeither Paul nor Keller gets the life he expects. Is Maestro primarily a study of disappointment and loss?
English Previous Curriculum, Look Both WaysThis text shows us that there is always more to people than we see on the surface. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Look Both WaysThe three main characters in Look Both Ways are afraid. Do you agree
English Previous Curriculum, Look Both WaysAll of the main characters in Look Both Ways are suffering in their own individual ways and are unable to move forward with their lives. What film techniques are used to explore these ideas?
English Previous Curriculum, A Man for All SeasonsRobert Bolt deliberately constructs the play to show two kinds of men for all seasons; those with integrity, and those without.
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard is an evil character but her remains the focus of the audience’s interest.
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesThere are no happy homes or supportive families in Hard Times. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Anna Frith, a woman who had faced more terrors then many warriors’ It is the women in the text that prove to be stronger in the face of adversity. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Malouf’s novel demonstrates that even in the midst of war and brutality, it is essential to retain one’s humanity’. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Hard Times‘Never wonder’ is a principle shared by Gradgrind and Harthouse, two characters with very different philosophies. How do characteristics on Hard Times display their commitment to this principle?
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesHard Times
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesHard Times
English Previous Curriculum, Minimum of Two‘Jerra’s story is that of a young man struggling grimly with conflicting desires and the weight of expectation.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Minimum of Two‘Minimum of Two shows us that family can be the cause of both suffering and salvation.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersThough the women suffer more than men, they are also more resilient and resourceful. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Girl With a Pearl Earring‘Griet’s involvement in Vermeer’s world comes at a cost to herself and to others.’ To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomDespite his role as king, Priam is a simple man
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWhat is the significance of storytelling in Ransom?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIn a world ruled by ancient gods, ‘Ransom’ contemplates the notion of free will. How free are the characters to defy their roles and change their destinies?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Even though he is not a warrior or king, Somax provides readers with as much insight into human experience as Achilles and Priam.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘All that belongs to the outward view. But there is also an inward view’
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesHard Times
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront demonstrates that collective action depends on the courage and conviction of a few individuals. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Minimum of Two‘Minimum of Two shows us that it is important to come to terms with the past if we are to live a satisfying present and future.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard exposes the dangers of excessive power. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘How does Rose use the setting and stage directions of the play to develop his key concerns?’
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontIn On the Waterfront Elia Kazan depicts a society in which personal survival is the highest priority. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom is a rich, moving, yet sometimes disturbing novel.’ To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomBoth Priam and Achilles need to come to terms with their pasts before the ransom can occur.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘A person’s identity and sense of belonging is intrinsically linked to their place of origin.’ To what extent do Lahiri’s stories support this view?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf humanises his characters. How is this achieved in Ransom?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIn what ways is fate central to the text?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWhat seems foolish is just as sensible sometimes.
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesMr Gradgrind, though hard enough, was by no means so rough a man as Mr Bounderby. His character was not unkind all things considered.
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroIt is only after Keller’s death that Paul learns to appreciate his teacher. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesHard Times
English Previous Curriculum, Nineteen Eighty-FourThe world of Nineteen Eighty-Four show how cruel social institutions can be for individuals.
English Previous Curriculum, Nineteen Eighty-FourWhy is the refusal to record the past accurately so important in the world of Nineteen Eighty-Four?
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethThe roles of prophecy and destiny
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethThe tragedy of Macbeth is that of a good man who gives way to his dark side. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront, set in the 1950′s, is a film directed by Elia Kazan that stresses the necessity of truth, and that we should never remain fearful and silent
English Previous Curriculum, CosiEach of the characters in Nowra’s play something to teach Lewis – and us. What does Lewis mean?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘I’m with me.’ Terry Malloy’s greatest achievement is developing a sense of social responsibility. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenThe Judge instructs the jury to ‘deliberate honestly and thoughtfully’. How closely is this instruction followed?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Deaf and dumb. No matter how much we hate the torpedoes, we don’t rat.’ What comment does On the Waterfront make on the issue of loyalty vs. morality?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIINo one in the play deserves sympathy. All characters are complicit in the chaos & anarchy we witness.
English Previous Curriculum, The Wife of Martin Guerre‘Significant experiences in our life have the potential to influence our identity.’
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIOnly by acting and deceiving can one achieve success.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the WoodsWe find truth inside or not at all.’ (p.298) In his novel, In the Lake of the Woods, Tim O’Brien suggests that truth is something we cannot fully know. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsHow does Hemingway use imagery, symbolism and language devices to visually convey his views on the human condition in war time?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘Hemingway sees men and women as very different to each other.’ Is this so in A Farewell to Arms?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsTo what extent are Catherine and Frederic victims of war?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIHow does the play explain Richard’s rise to power?
English Previous Curriculum, NightNight is a story of loss and change.
English Previous Curriculum, The Wife of Martin GuerreOur identity is shaped by forces beyond our control.
English Previous Curriculum, A Man for All SeasonsThomas More is a selfish man: he holds to his beliefs at the expense of other people’s welfare. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, CosiThe Black Comedy play Cosi is set in the 1970′s amidst the Vietnam War, sexual revolution and the introduction of ‘free love’.
English Previous Curriculum, Julius CaesarTo what extent does Julius Caesar contribute to his own downfall?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard III
English Previous Curriculum, Look Both WaysLook Both Ways
English Previous Curriculum, A Man for All SeasonsSpeech- A Man For All Seasons
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolHow does Dickens show us that a selfish life is an unsatisfactory life?
English Previous Curriculum, A Doll’s HouseA Doll’s House
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn The Waterfront’s ending is highly ambiguous. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘We have reasonable doubt, and this is a safeguard which has enormous value in our system.’ To what extent is reasonable doubt alone shown to be an effective safeguard?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenIn ‘Twelve Angry Men’, no juror can be wholly sure of the truth. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenHow is racism portrayed in ‘Twelve Angry Men’ and how is it overcome?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘Every person has a right to take care of themselves. He always did.’ How does Dickens show us that a selfish life is an unsatisfactory life?
English Previous Curriculum, The OutsiderCamus describes his hero as a man driven by ‘a tenacious and therefore profound passion, the passion for an absolute truth a truth born of the living and feeling’. How does the story of Meursault reflect this?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIIn some places Shakespeare makes Richard a monster, in others he keeps him human
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘In The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Hamid makes it very difficult for readers to like Changez.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, The Great Gatsby‘That’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool’. In The Great Gatsby, the female characters are forced to act as shadows to men. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsThe novel shows that adversity brings out the most admirable human qualities. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsThere’s Nothing Worse Than War
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsWar Heroism in A Farewell to Arms.
English Previous Curriculum, Into Thin AirSpeech- Into Thin Air
English Previous Curriculum, Nineteen Eighty-FourWinston is the cause of his own suffering
English Previous Curriculum, Nineteen Eighty-FourIn Nineteen Eighty-Four the party is brutally effective in controlling the people.
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesHard Times
English Previous Curriculum, A Man for All SeasonsThomas More is the only ‘man for all seasons’ in the play. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIThe play presents a thoroughly selfish world. Everyone is driven by self interest alone. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontIt is simply love that changes Terry, not principles and regrets. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersHow does Year of Wonders demonstrate the Dshervyn of holding on to faith in times of adversity?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard undermines others but falls victim to his own insecurities
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolScrooge changes when he recognises that he is not alone. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenRose’s stage directions are essential. Without them, the audience would not understand his intended social critique.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsAlthough Hemingway portrays the horrors of war, ‘A Farewell to Arms’ is not an anti-war novel. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Man for All SeasonsA Man For All Seasons
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘I’m standin’ over here now.’ How has Terry gained a new understanding of himself and the world?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenThe playwright contends that prejudice can mystify fact and disrupt attaining a fair and just verdict.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront is the story of Terry’s journey to heroism’
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsCatherine and Henry’s relationship is built only on a desire to escape the realities of war. do you agree
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf states that the ‘primary interest’ of Ransom is in storytelling
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf’s use of language and imagery in Ransom shows us the value of appreciating what is around us everyday
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘The process of reproducing Mozart’s opera Cosi is cathartic for every character.’ Agree or disagree.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Malouf’s use of language and imagery in Ransom shows the value for appreciating what is around us in every day’. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Nineteen Eighty-FourThe bleak setting of Nineteen Eighty-Four reflects the bleak lives of the characters.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolHow does Dickens suggest the Scrooge values all that is wrong?
English Previous Curriculum, Julius CaesarBrutus’s idealism prevents him from being a great leader. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Why don’t you keep that big mouth of yours shut.’ On The Waterfront demonstrates that remaining silent is the only way to survive under Johnny Friendly’s reign. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders demonstrates the sinister side of religious fervour’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomRansom demonstrates that even in the midst of war and brutality, it is essential to retain one’s humanity. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersAnna Frith’s narration of events in YOW conveys the idea that humanity is at the mercy of the natural world’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWords speak louder than actions in Ransom. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomHow does Malouf explore the different experiences of loss presented throughout the novel?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom is a tale of fathers and sons.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom is a tale of fathers and sons.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesCivilisation itself was a disease, and it was not our disorder that was so horrible, but our order. Discuss with reference to Hard Times.
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesHard Times
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist explores the relationship between the personal and the political.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistIs Changez as ‘reluctant’ as the title suggests?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘Despite the title, The Reluctant Fundamentalist is not about religious fundamentalism.’ How does the novel challenge the reader’s conception of fundamentalism?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘Time only moves in one direction. Remember that. Things always change.’ How do the characters in The Reluctant Fundamentalist respond to change?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistExamine the importance of setting and atmosphere in The Reluctant Fundamentalist
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersExploring how Anna’s view of the world changes throughout Year of Wonders
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘This Plague will make heroes of us all.’In what ways do the villagers of Eyam become heroes?
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroPaul is difficult to like, but easy to understand
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesHard Times
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesHard Times
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersConflict can reveal unexpected qualities in an individual.
English Previous Curriculum, The Things They CarriedSurviving the Vietnam War proves to be a painful experience for most characters in The Things They Carried. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, MontanaDiscuss the exploitation of power carried out by those in control in ‘Montana 1948.’
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Characters in Cosi have much to gain from being part of the opera Cosi fan tutte.’ Expand.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontKazan’s On the Waterfront reinforces his belief that in certain circumstances it is necessary to become an informant. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Hard Times‘I am sure you know that the whole social system is a question of self-interest.’ How does Dickens create a dystopian picture of Victorian England in Hard Times? Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Hard TimesIn Hard Times Dickens suggest that it is through compassionate individuals rather than institutions that people can be helped. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Hard Times‘Hard Times demonstrates the negative effects of industrialisation.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Hard Times‘Never wonder’ is a principle shared by Gradgrind and Harthouse, two characters with very different philosophies. How do different characters in Hard Times display their commitment to this principle?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘I woke to the slow tolling of our church bell, ringing once again for the dead.’ Brooks gives the reader limited room for optimism in her novel. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘In what ways is loneliness explored in Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies’?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersYear of Wonders demonstrates the destructive power of love. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘The stories in ‘Interpreter of Maladies’ are rich in symbolic meaning.’ How does Lahiri achieve this?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘It is those who leave their homeland that struggle the most in Interpreter of Maladies.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘Tell me the secret. I want to know.’To what extent do the secrets the characters keep affect their lives?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesLahiri’s stories are about much more than the migrant experience. They also explore ‘maladies’ common to all people.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘In seeking to improve their lives, some of the characters in the stories lose sight of what they truly value.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘Lahiri’s stories show the importance of communication in relationships.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroMaestro’ suggests that it is more important to develop and maintain relationships than it is to achieve success. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘Lahiri’s stories show that all people face challenges no matter where they live in the world.’ To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIThe character of Richard is shown to be so much more than that of a one dimensional evil man.
English Previous Curriculum, Farenheit 451There is only one hero in Fahrenheit 451. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, The Kite Runner‘It is wrong what they say about the past, I’ve learned, about how you can bury it. Because the past claws its way out.’With reference to the Kite Runner, do you agree with Amir’s claim?
English Previous Curriculum, The Kite RunnerThe Kite Runner is a story of courage and cowardice. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIn Ransom, Malouf suggests that we need to alter our conventional roles if we are to discover our true selves.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘I was in four and a half years never an American, but I was immediately a New Yorker’. Why is Changez unable to become an American.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontHow does Kazan convey ideas about good and evil ‘On the Waterfront’?
English Previous Curriculum, Into the WildIdentity is defined as ‘The collective aspect of the set of characteristics by which a thing is definitively recognizable or known.’
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroKeller has more influence on shaping Paul’s life than anything or anyone else. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersHow does Brooks develop a sense of time and place in this novel?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘The Plague was a vehicle for unleashing the hidden fears and suspicions that governed the lives of the village.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersIs Anna exempt from the self-interest that characterises many characters in the novel?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘I woke to the slow tolling of our church bell, ringing once again for the dead.’ ‘Brooks gives the reader limited room for optimism in her novel’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersWhile many characters in Year of Wonders display admirable qualities, Anna Frith is the true heroine of the novel. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersHow does the narrator, Anna Frith, affect your reading of the novel?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘The story of a rat with honour’. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontThe themes are conveyed as much by imagery and symbolism as by the events and dialogue. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Elia Kazan shows us that loyalty can be fulfilling but also a burden’
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘It’s simply love that changes Terry, not principles or regrets.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront’s ending is highly ambiguous. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘I was jealous for both of them at once. Of him, because Elinor loved him, and I hungered for a greater share of her love than I ever hoped for.’ What is the nature of Elinor, Michael and Anna’s relationship?
English Previous Curriculum, Dear America – Letters Home from VietnamIn war there are no unwounded soldiers, to what extent does ‘Dear America’ support this view.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Conflicting views of humanity and nature are at the centre of this novel.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesLahiri’s anthology ‘Interpreter of Maladies’ explores the nature of the human experience and the ways in which humanity relates to each other.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiIn ‘Cosi’, Louis Nowra shows us that a person’s commitment to facing challenges can cause their attitudes, values and beliefs to change
English Previous Curriculum, CosiIn the play ‘Cosi’, Louis Nowra explores the nature of madness and what defines ‘normality’.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesThe concerns about the nature of human experience expressed by Lahiri in ‘Interpreter of Maladies’ are universally relevant.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Although the women in Year of Wonders suffer more than the men, they are also more resilient and resourceful.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Dear America – Letters Home from VietnamThe raw materials in Dear America are shaped into a powerful book.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontIn Kazan’s film, the American dream is exposed as being an illusion and success a transitory result of exploiting others. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontCharley Malloy is just as heroic as his brother. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Which side are you with? Me, I’m with me, Terry.’Terry never makes a choice, he is always doing it for himself. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘I was ratting on myself all those years and I didn’t even know it I’m glad what I done to you’. ‘On the Waterfront’ suggests that it is more important for an individual to obey their conscience than to conform to expectations. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontJohnny Friendly is as much a victim of the system as those he helps to exploit. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘I want to know who killed my brother’. Who is responsible for Joey’s death?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersIn times of crisis, survival rather than selflessness becomes the major focus. In ‘Year of wonders’ this is shown to be true of most of the characters. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersHow Brooks creates meaning through recurring symbols and imagery, novel structure and historical conventions in the Year of Wonders. Present a commentary on several key passages.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersAnna Friths strength allows her to rise above the cruel intentions of others around her.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘The Interpreter of Maladies’ – Are Lahiri’s stories exclusively about Indians?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘YOW demonstrates that crisis brings out the darker side of human nature.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Anna’s strength lies in her ability to rise above the cruel intentions of those around her.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersThere is more than one type of sacrifice in Year of Wonders. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersThroughout the historical novel, Year of Wonders, Geraldine Brooks recreates the events of 1666.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront is a story about the achievement of self-respect. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIAt the beginning of the play Richard asserts his determination ‘ to prove a villan’. Does he succeed?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIThe play shows Richard in such a way that it is impossible for an audience to feel any sympathy for him. Do you agree.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenDespite questioning the ultimate fairness and reliability of the jury system, Twelve Angry Men is at heart a tribute to this system. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenWhy is it so difficult for the jury in Twelve Angry Men to reach its’ final verdict?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontThere are no heroes in On the Waterfront. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love StoriesJosefina asks: ‘What is love?’. How important is love in this film?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront demonstrates that collective action depends on the courage and conviction of a few individuals.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersYear of Wonders – Themes, Ideas and Quotes
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersThe narration reinforces the view that woman are stronger than men. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘How does cinematography enhance the struggle that the characters face in On The Waterfront?’
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesThe Interpreter of Maladies: What kinds of reality are presented by Lahiri and are they to the character’s detriment?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesFor Mrs Sen, ‘ Everything is there’ (this is, in India.) What instances are there in these stories of exile and estrangemnet, both emotionally and culturally?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesIn Jhumpa Lahiri’s short stories, social and cultural differences can lead to both misunderstandings and enlightenmnent between her characteres. Do you agree with this statement?
English Previous Curriculum, Life of PiMartel presents his viewpoint of life through the profusion of detail in his writing. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Life of PiThe text Life of Pi is open to multiple readings, how does this alter meaning for the reader.
English Previous Curriculum, Life of Pi‘Life of Pi shows that is it possible to live a life of co-existence with opposites.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Life of PiYann Martel’s use of symbolism and imagery encourages the reader to question reality. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love StoriesThe hunt for the jaguar in de Heer’s film is more complex than just the search for a marauding killer. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love StoriesThe Old Man Who Read Love Stories emphasizes the importance of memory in shaping one’s identity. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘The 8th juror is able to change the minds of the eleven jurors not because he is right but because he is persuasive.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Quit worrying about the truth all the time… Worry about yourself…’To what extent is this the point of view of the film?
English Previous Curriculum, Julius Caesar‘The fault is not in our stars, but in ourselves’ What fault in man does Shakespeare highlight in this play?
English Previous Curriculum, Maestro‘So different and yet so similar…’ Is this the way you see Keller and Paul?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenWhy is it so difficult for the jury in Twelve Angry Men to reach it’s final verdict? Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiLewis tells Roy, ‘no one is a success or failure’. How much does the play support or refute this statement?
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCosi is a comedy yet has a serious side. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Home‘Home’: Lines on paper, like a map, all pointing the way home.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘How people react to a situation is determined by their history and culture.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Rabbit Proof FenceTopic: The Film Rabbit Proof Fence is ultimately an uplifting story of resilience and survival
English Previous Curriculum, Dear America – Letters Home from VietnamBernard Edelman’s anthology Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam demonstrates that courage has many different forms’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders’ depicts the trials and sufferings of the town of Eyam during the Plague year 1665-6.
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroMaestro suggests that it is more important to develop and maintain relationships that it is to achieve success. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesInterpreter of Maladies examines the impact of acceptance and rejection on people.’
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘Interpreter of Maladies shows that all relationships are fraught with difficulties.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders’: Historical and Social Context
English Previous Curriculum, Julius CaesarHow is the art of persuasion shown to be a powerful tool in Julius Caesar?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersYear of Wonders – Chapter Annotations
English Previous Curriculum, Things We Didn’t See Coming‘The disasters in the text add nothing to the story.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Things We Didn’t See ComingThere are no bad characters in ‘Things We Didn’t See Coming.’ Everyone is just doing the best they can to survive
English Previous Curriculum, Things We Didn’t See ComingThe text shows a society in which facts are uncertain, relationships are temporary, and decisions are based purely on self-interest.
English Previous Curriculum, Things We Didn’t See ComingThe protagonist learns that he can’t survive without others in ‘Things We Didn’t See Coming’
English Previous Curriculum, The Kite RunnerIs Amir the man his father hoped he would be? Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, LantanaThe truth is rarely pure and never simple.
English Previous Curriculum, Medea‘While the manner of Medea’s revenge is repugnant, it is in the end, just.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Justin: The most important thing is to feel you are in control.’ Does Cos suggest that illusions are more powerful than reality?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesThe stories of Interpreter of Maladies are an examination of various forms of human frailty. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesMarriage and community are the central focus of women in Lahiri’s stories. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Immigrant Chronicle‘Our identity and sense of place is defined and changed by the stages of our lives’
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenTwelve Angry Men, written and set in the 1950′s by Reginald Rose, the playwright seeks to depict the American judicial system and its flaws, but also how these flaws can be overcome.
English Previous Curriculum, To Kill a Mockingbird‘To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel about courage’To what extent do you agree with this statement?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘The characters in ‘Year of Wonders’ lose faith in humanity rather than in God.’ To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Father Barry and Edie Doyle are crucial in the moral redemption of Terry Malloy.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront suggests that it is more important for an individual to obey their conscience than to conform to group expectations.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘How does On the Waterfront explore the power of the individual?’
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront is a story about the battle between good and evil.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersYear of Wonders demonstrates the difficulties of holding in to faith in times of adversity.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront – Themes and Characters
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront is a story about the battle between good and evil. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Some people think the crucifixion only took place on Calvary Hill’. Discuss with reference of symbolism in ‘On The Waterfront’.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontNone of us are absolute heroes or villains. How does Kazan use film techniques to convey the shades of grey in On the Waterfront?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘The plague will make heroes of us all, whether we will or no.’ How heroic are the people of Eyam?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersThe plague attacks not only individuals but the very structure of society. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love StoriesThe fact that Antonio and Josefina live ‘happily ever after’ doesn’t change the fact that this story is essentially without hope. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders demonstrates the devastating power of grief and suspicion’. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, CosiMozart wrote ‘women are like that’ due to their infidelity. Do the characters in Cosi confirm this belief?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersWhat does Brooks suggest about the different responses to crisis shown in ‘Year of Wonders’?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersMichael Mompellion pwerful need for control is behind many of his actions.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘ Why should this good women lie here, in such extermity, when a man like my father lived to waste his reason on drunkenness.’ There is little justice in Year of Wonders, Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersFrom death and destruction inevitably comes rebirth
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders’ demonstrates that times of crisis bring out the darker side of human nature. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘It’s about important things like love and fidelity’ How important is love and loyalty to the characters within the play?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Malouf’s novel demonstrates that even in the midst of war and brutality, it is essential to retain one’s humanity.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Despite being a king, Priam is, in the end, simply a man.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them.’ Does the novel suggest that there is no value in courage?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Michael Mompellion’s powerful need for control is behind many of his actions’. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘I wonder if you know how much you have changed.’ In what ways does Anna change?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders shows how a crisis can bring out the best and the worst in human beings.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersYear of Wonders explores how fear can teach apart the lives of individuals and society as a whole. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWhat role does chance play in Ransom?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomAre there any true heroes in Ransom?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘This old fellow, like most old storytellers, is a stealer of other men’s tales, of other men’s lives.’ ‘Malouf uses Ransom to explore the significance of storytelling’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Despite being a king, Priam is, in the end, simply a man.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomSomax is upset at being renamed Idaeus. What is the power and function of names in Ransom?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomRansom is a novel of fathers and sons. What is being revealed about the pressures of both parenting and growing up?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIn a world ruled by ancient gods, Ransom contemplates the notion of free will. How free are the characters to defy their roles and change their destinies?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront- Kazan uses a range of cinematic devices to reveal the emotional and moral struggle of Terry Malloy. Discuss -
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontHow does Kazan convey ideas about good and evil in ‘On the Waterfront’?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront shows that being true to oneself is more important than being loyal to one’s friends.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWhat is the purpose of names?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomCan nobility or honour exist in war?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomDefying roles in Ransom
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront Assignment: Themes and Characters.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomThe role of fathers in Ransom
English Previous Curriculum, CosiRoy is the most effective manipulator in the play. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomHow the name ‘Ransom’ relates to the novel’s themes and ideas.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomPain and loss in Ransom
English Previous Curriculum, RansomAre there any true heros in Ransom?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenReginal Rose vindicates rather than destroys our belied in the jury system as a menas of securing justice. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘I was a modern day Janissary, a servan of the American Empire at a time when it was invading a country with kinship to mine.’
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘Twelve Angry Men presents the pessimistic opinion that all humans are fallible’. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘What creatures we are, eh, sir? With so much life and will, and then, pfff, it’s ended.’ In Ransom, Malouf shows us that our common humanity is more important than status, wealth or fame. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Things We Didn’t See Coming‘All relationships in Things We Didn’t See Coming are characterised by selfishness and insensitivity.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Things We Didn’t See Coming‘It is the narrator’s own qualities as a human that offers the most hope in Things We Didn’t See Coming.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Things We Didn’t See ComingIn Things We Didn’t See Coming Amsterdam focuses more on the nature of humanity than on the environmental disasters that have befallen them. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsIn A Farewell To Arms, how does Hemingway convey the underlying meaninglessness of war?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront tells us that we need the support of others in order to act bravely. Do you agree?’
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWhat gives Ransom its emotional impact?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘A Farewell to Arms’: ‘Fredric Henry lives in a godless world devoid of faith.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Minimum of Two‘People without groups to belong to are vulnerable in many ways’
English Previous Curriculum, Minimum of Two‘We compromise our true sense of self in order to fulfil our public roles’
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Terry Malloy is the true hero of On the Waterfront’. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Are there any true heroes in Ransom?’
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIIn ‘Richard III’, Shakespeare warns of the dangers of trusting in appearances. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘How does Ransom show storytelling to be an important aspect of life?’
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘ The characters in The Reluctant Fundamentalise are simply that – people in Cangez past and present. Discuss.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘Changez narcissism means that he is divorced from reality.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistChangez tells the American listener the ‘ I lacked a stab;e core. I was not certain where I belonged.’ Does Changez find where he belongs?
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroThe characters in Maestro learn to live with regrets. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Maestro‘To what extent are Paul and Keller paralysed by their past experiences?’
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘In On the Waterfront, Kazan implies that redemption is possible for some.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘A Farewell to Arms’ demonstrates how impossible it is to escape the harsh realities of war.’
English Previous Curriculum, Richard III‘It is in the folly of others that allows Richard to success.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘Hemingway suggests in ‘A Farewell to Arms’ that life is essentially futile’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Nowra challenges his audience with their own stereotypes about madness and addiction.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Roy is the most effective manipulator in the play.’Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiLucy says to Lewis, ‘working with these people has changed you.’Do you think Lewis has really changed by the end of the play?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘There isn’t always an explanation for everything.’A Farewell to Arms argues that life has no meaning.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiHow does Nowra demonstrate that most of our attitudes to mental illness are based on ignorance? Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Cosi’ explores a world of illusion and a world in which the arts are seen as a able to remove people from the harshness of everyday life.” Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘ Discuss how Louis Nowra uses the opera Cosi Fan Tutte within his play
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘He’s just a confused kid.’ What causes Terry Malloy to grow beyond this point?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Understanding what is real and what is not is never easy.’
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Johnny Friendly is as much a victim of the system as those he helps to exploit.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, CosiLouis Nowra’s Cosi questions whether or not ‘love is an emotional indulgence for the privileged few.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard is only a product of his time and society. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders’ shows us just how little power we have. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Macbeth‘Had I power, I should pour the sweet milk of concord into hell.’ What does Shakespeare reveal about the nature of political ambition?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontMost powerful agent essay
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroMaestro reveals that failure can ultimately result in success. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontAmerican dream, transitory essay
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenTwelve Angry Men is less about guilt or innocence than about reasonable doubt’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Mississippi BurningThe Greatest Threat To Justice, Will & Knowledge
English Previous Curriculum, Brave New WorldThe Flaws of Fordist Society
English Previous Curriculum, Maestro‘First impression? Misleading of course.’ How does Paul’s view of Keller influence the reader’s understanding of Keller?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard is most destructive to himself. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistMany characters in this novel are dangerously addicted to nostalgia and as a result they lose their identity. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroThe Maestro and Paul are both unattractive and arrogant throughout the text. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘In Year of Wonders, characters are tested on many levels. Discuss.’
English Previous Curriculum, Minimum of Two‘We find strength when we belong’
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersIt is solely the plague that torments the villagers in ‘YEAR OF WONDERS’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard’s rhetoric can conquer everything but his own conscience
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethCertain individuals are not always protected by the society in which they live
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethGuilt is the driving force in the destruction of individuals in society.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiLouis Nowra presents an uncompromising critique of 1970′s radicalism in Australia
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘It is not just Lewis who has a cathartic experience during the production of ‘Cosi’; the cast also emerge transformed’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroMusic is a vital element in Goldsworthy’s novel. It allows us to understand much about the central characters. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIThe play does not need Queen Margaret’s curses because characters doom themselves by their own words and actions.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard says to Anne: ‘ I’ll have her, but I will not keep her long’, How are woman portrayed in this play?
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIThe play does not need Queen Margaret’s curses becuase characters doom themselves by their own words and actions
English Previous Curriculum, Maestro‘I was content to let others make decisions that in no way seemed important… yet.’ Does Paul Crabbe ever learn to make independent decisions?
English Previous Curriculum, MaestroIn Maestro, Peter Goldsworthy endorses the values of self awareness regardless of the cost.
English Previous Curriculum, Richard IIIRichard understands the weaknesses of others better than his own
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘In On the Waterfront Kazan demonstrates that personal growth occurs even in difficult circumstances.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Brave New WorldThe End of Freedom, A Note Left for the Unseen Future
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCosi shows us that ‘fairytale endings’ do not reflect real life. How does Nowra’s play show us the complexity of people’s existence?
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘The characters in Cosi suggest that we are all longing for purpose and intimacy in our lives.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Without love the world wouldn’t mean much’. To what extent does Nowra’s play endorse this view?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIn ransom, true heroism is demonstrated by the major characters ability to display compassion. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCharacter analysis
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenRose’s play vindicates, rather than destroys, the audience’s belief in the judicial system as a means of securing justice. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsWho is the true hero in A Farwell to Arms? Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘If people bring so much courage to the world. The world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them.’ Does the A Farewell to Arms show that courage is useless?
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCultural Identity is a benchmark for understanding others
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCosi is more than an entertaining comedy. It reveals the sadness of the lives of the characters. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsA Farewell to Arms is a novel without hope. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiThemes in Cosi
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront’ is based on the concept of leadership’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiIt is only those who are prepared to take risks who achieve success. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘Frederic Henry’s life is most difficult, but Catherine suffers more deeply.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘A Farewell to Arms demonstrates that both love and war are futile.’ To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘We are Golgotha – the place of skullsand yet we are Gethsemane, the garden of waiting, and of prayer.’ [Mompellion] How important is religious faith for the community of Eyam
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCosi is a reminder of how vulnerable people are. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Cosi shows that love is a universal human experience’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘The Plague destroyed everything; it not only took people’s lives, it wiped out their trust and their humanity.’Discuss Year of Wonders in light of this assessment.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf uses Ransom to explore the significance of sotrytelling. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom focuses on a masculine world of heroes and warfare. There is only a minor role for the feminine.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Somax- the storyteller- is the only hero of Ransom’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenThe jurors all heard the same evidence. How do you account for their differing responses?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenThe most dangerous characters are the least engaged. Do you agree?A
English Previous Curriculum, CosiLewis says ‘Love is not so important nowadays.’ [pg10] How does his view on love and fidelity change throughout the play?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘In Twelve Angry Men, the characteristics of gentleness and rationality are valued above all else.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, CosiLewis tells Roy, ‘no one is a success or failure’. How much does the play support or refute this statement?
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘they blossomed. Nlossomed.’ To what extent so the characters develop in the play Cosi?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘Although Dickens’ story is entertaining, even enthralling, it is mainly intended to educate.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to Arms‘…but at my back I always hear Time’s winged Chariot hurrying near’. To what extent is Frederic and Catherine’s behaviour a response to war?
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCosi shows us that the theatre has the power to transform lives. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Cosi shows that love is a universal human experience.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Love is not so important these days’… ‘What planet are you from?’ Love means something different to each character in the play.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘Scrooge is important, but not as important as some of the lesser characters in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Pride and PrejudiceJane Austen has often been criticized for simply creating in Pride and Prejudice a shallow romance novel. Not a literary work of significance. Dicuss with specific reference to the text.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiLucy says to Lewis, ‘working with these people has changed you’. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesChanging one’s life will always come at some cost. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiDespite the comedy in Cosi there is an underlying sadness throughout the play.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiThe opera transforms people’s lives. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenWhile we would aspire to display the courage of Juror 8, it is the flaws of the other jurors that make them more realistic. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistThe Reluctant Fundamentalist is a novel about trauma.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiDiscuss how Louis Nowra uses the opera ‘ Cosi Fan Tutte’ within his play.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistTo what extent is ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’ about nostalgia?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsHemingway is often referred to as an existentialist writer. How does Hemingway’s values and writing style fit this categorisation?
English Previous Curriculum, A Farewell to ArmsPassini says ‘There is nothing worse than war.’ Does ‘A Farewell to Arms’ show this to be true?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersWhat re Brook’s messages about redemption and atonement?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersMichael Mompellion and Religion -Year of Wonders Notes
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersChanges in Anna – Year of Wonders Notes
English Previous Curriculum, RansomThe key to a great story is not what it says, but how it is told.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiGrowth in Cosi
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWhat does Malouf suggest about the namture of humanity?
English Previous Curriculum, CosiRomantic Love in Cosi
English Previous Curriculum, RansomRansom seeks to convey the perennial and inversal appeal of storytelling
English Previous Curriculum, RansomHow does Ransom challenge the notion of strength?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomHe has done something for which he will be remembered as long as stories are told.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersAnna’s strength lies in her ability to accept reality. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontA Controversial Story of Betrayal. Is This How You See On the Waterfront?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolScrooge’s Only Way of Understanding Himself is Through Others. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, MedeaMedea is Difficult to Feel Sympathetic For.
English Previous Curriculum, MedeaMedea is Careless of Family Ties.
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethTo What Extent is Macbeth Responsible For His Own Downfall?
English Previous Curriculum, Into the WildWhat Motivated Chris McCandless to Vanish Without Trace From His Family Home, What Did He Hope to Achieve and to What Extent Did He Achieve It?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontLove Changes Terry Not Principles or Regrets.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘It is Conscience That Turns Terry Malloy Against the Mob.’ Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom’ Demonstrates That it is a Man’s Actions That Define Him. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenHow does Twelve Angry Men show that prejudice can obscure the truth?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomThe goddess Iris describes to Priam ‘a world that is subject to chance’. What roles do the concepts of fate and free will play in Ransom?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘Reginald Rose vindicates rather than destroys our belief in the jury system as a means of securing justice.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘A Simple Tale of a Rat With Honour.’ Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersTo What Extent Does the Plague Empower the Weaker People of Eyam?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontThe Femininity of Edie Serves as a Significant Contrast to the Dark World of the Dockworkers. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistTo What Extent is ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’ About Nostalgia?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistHow Does Hamid Suggest That Matters of Cultural Difference Result in Brutality?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘Interpreter of Maladies’ Examines the Impact of Acceptance and Rejection.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesLahiri’s Stories Show the Importance of Connection in People’s Lives. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘Interpreter of Maladies’ Shows That All Relationships Are Fraught With Difficulties.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomOur Understanding of Reality is Dependent Upon Both Time and Place.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenTwelve Angry Men shows how prejudice can obscure the truth
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘It was ‘the conventions of this small and watchful town’ that proved more harmful than the plague.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolIn ‘A Christmas Carol’, How Does Dickens Show That a Selfish Life is an Unsatisfactory Life? Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolIn ‘A Christmas Carol’, Dickens Suggests That If Scrooge Can Change, So Too Can Society.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolEbenezer Scrooge is Addicted to Materialistice Success; He Has Removed Love and Compassion From His Life. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolWhat Does Scrooge Learn About Himself Through the Visitations of the Ghosts.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomPriam rejects his humanity in an attempt to be a perfect king while Achilles is a victim of his own humanity. How does the novel Ransom show us what it means to be human?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomJust as Iris Suggests, it is Chance That Leads Priam to Achieve What He Does. Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Dear America – Letters Home from Vietnam‘Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam’ presents a variety of perspectives on conflict and loss. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men3rd Juror says that ‘everybody deserves a fair trial.’ Does the defendant in this case get a fair trial?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘Tiny Tim is at the Centre of A Christmas Carol.’ Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Sense and SensibilityAusten Has Much to Say About Making the Right Choice When it Comes to Marriage.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolDickens uses the characters in ‘A Christmas Carol’ to reflect his criticisms of the alienating impact of the Industrial Revolution and the lack of morality which accompanied it. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersThe Historical Fiction Novel ‘Year of Wonders’ Describes the Rural Village of Eyam’s Contraction of the Plague and the Transpiring Events.
English Previous Curriculum, The Kite RunnerIt is Amir’s Childhood That Leads to His Need For Redemption.
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethMacbeth is Solely Responsible For the Death and Destruction in the Play. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, MedeaIt is Very Difficult to Have Sympathy With Medea, ‘the Child-Killer’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenTwelve Angry Men – Themes and Quotes
English Previous Curriculum, The Kite RunnerThe Kite Runner explores how guilt and a desire for atonement can be powerful forces in people’s lives. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenHow does Twelve Angry Men explore the democratic process?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenIt is the Individual Characteristics of Each of the Jurors That are Crucial to the Outcome in Twelve Angry Men.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom’ is a celebration of what often goes unremarked.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontHow Does ‘On the Waterfront’ Depict Terry’s Emotional and Moral Struggles?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontJoey and Edie Are Both Catalysts for Terry’s Transition. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Terry Molloy is an unlikely hero.’ How does the film-maker convince the viewer that Terry has the qualities necessary to make a stand against the mob’s control of the waterfront?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘There’s one thing we have in this country and that’s ways of fighting back.’ How does ‘On the Waterfront’ explore the power of the individual?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront’ is not the story of one man’s journey to redemption, but the revolution of a whole community against violence and oppression.
English Previous Curriculum, Nineteen Eighty-FourOrwell Presents Newspeak as the Most Significant Form of Control Over the People in ’1984′.
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethDiscuss the importance of religion in the Play. Find evidence that supports the power and presence of providence or God in the Play and discuss to what extent Macbeth is a Christian drama.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Pop, I’ve seen so many things that I know are so wrong’. Why is Edie so clear on the wrongdoings on the waterfront, yet the men are so blind to all other crimes?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersDo All Characters in ‘Year Of Wonders’ Put Their Own Interests Above All Else?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘I woke to the slow tolling of our church bell, ringing once again for the dead.’ Brooks gives the reader limited room for optimism in her novel. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘The struggle of an ordinary man with his conscience’. Is this how you saw ‘On the Waterfront’?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘You expect this wolf, this violator of every law of gods and men, to take the gift you hold out to him and act like a man?’ What does Malouf suggest is the essence of manhood?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom’ suggests that storytelling is an essential element of human nature.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘In a world ruled by the ancient gods, Ransom contemplates the notion of free will. How free are the characters to defy their roles and change their destinies?’
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom”There was a town hereabouts.’ In what ways does Ransom explore the workings of memory?’
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom”There was a town hereabouts.’ In what ways does Ransom explore the workings of memory?’
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Words speak louder than actions in Ransom.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom depicts a determinedly male world, where the women are only incidental characters.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘Ransom is a story of vengeance clashing with grief.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontHow Does Kazan Convey Ideas About Good and Evil in ‘On the Waterfront’?
English Previous Curriculum, CosiThe People in ‘Cosi’ Are Flawed Regardless Of Whether They Are Sane or Insane. Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolScrooge’s Real Problem is That He Has No Responsibility to Others. He is Happy To Remain in an Insular World. Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Sense and SensibilityNot Only is the Future of Women Determined by Financial Concerns and Family Pressure, But Also the Future of Many Men. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Girl With a Pearl Earring‘I found it hard to meet Pieter the Son’s eye. His kindness pained me.’ Pieter becomes Griet’s salvation from an untenable situation. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Girl With a Pearl EarringThe Novel Demonstrates That a Love of Art Can Enrich Any Life, Even a Life That is Most Deprived. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenDemocracy and the Right to Serve as a Juror is a Great Privilege and Grave Responsibility Which is Not to be Taken Lightly. Discuss in Reference to Twelve Angry Men.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenWhy is it so Difficult For the Jury in ‘Twelve Angry Men’ to Reach Its Final Verdict?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘Twelve Angry Men’ shows that prejudice can obscure the truth. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenJuror 11 says ‘Facts may be coloured by the personalities of the people who present them.’ Is he right?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘Shouldn’t everyone care about everybody else?’ ‘On the Waterfront’ shows us that social justice will eventually triumph over self-interest. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistChangez tells the American, ‘Your senses are as acute as those of a fox in the wild’. Discuss the various references to predator and prey.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘I’m standing over here now.’ At the end of ‘On the Waterfront’ Terry has gained a new understanding of himself and the world. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront’ Portrays a World Where People Are Only Successful Through Money and Violence.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCosi – Creative Piece
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCosi is Really a Tragedy, Not a Comedy.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiCosi Shows That Love is a Universal Human Experience. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Justin explains that the point of the play was to engage the patients and bring them out of their shells’. Do you think Cosi Fan Tutte achieves this?
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront’ Demonstrates That Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontHow Does the Film Position Us to Sympathise With Terry Malloy?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontElia Kazan’s ‘On the Waterfront’ shows that being true to oneself is more important than being loyal to one’s friends.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders’ is Primarily a Study of Grief and Loss, or Does it Offer the Reader an Uplifting Optimistic Message?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘I was, in four and a half years, never an American; I was immediately a New Yorker.’ Why is Changez unable to become an American?
English Previous Curriculum, Macbeth‘This dead butcher and his fiend-like queen.’ How accurate is this a description of the Macbeths?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolDiscuss the Role of the Ghosts in ‘A Christmas Carol’.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘Twelve Angry Men is best interpreted as an attack on the jury system.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenThe 7th Juror tells the 8th Juror: ‘You’re not gonna change anybody’s mind. So if you want to be stubborn and hang this jury, go ahead.’ The verdict at the conclusion of Twelve Angry Men is thanks to a single man’s determination. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenThe setting of Twelve Angry Men acts as a microcosm, reflecting the strengths and weaknesses of America in the 1950′s.
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethWhat is the Role of the Witches in Macbeth?
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethWhat is the Role of Equivocation in Macbeth?
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethIs Macbeth’s Downfall Justified?
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethIn Macbeth, Shakespeare explores the power of ambition.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistChangez is Gradually Revealed to be an Unreliable Narrator
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethHow True is it to Say That Macbeth Brought Disaster Upon Himself?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistFilm and Fiction in The Reluctant Fundamentalist
English Previous Curriculum, Macbeth‘Macbeth is doomed not by fate, but by a flaw in his character.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Macbeth‘Macbeth is doomed not by fate, but by a flaw in his character.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Macbeth‘Macbeth is more of a victim than a villain.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Macbeth‘Macbeth is more a victim than a villain.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘We may not like Wade, but by the end of the novel we certainly sympathise with him.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘There is no such thing as truth, only individual interpretation.’ Discuss in relation to the text.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘The text suggests that there is no truth, only conflicting possibilities.’ Discuss in relation to the text.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘It is not only his role in the Vietnam War that is responsible for John Wade’s problems.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethDo you think Macbeth was wholly to blame for his downfall, or were there mitigating circumstances?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘Twelve Angry Men’ Shows That Prejudice Can Obscure the Truth. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf Uses Ransom to Explore the Significance of Storytelling. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIs Somax’s View of Humanity Important in Ransom? Explain Your View.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIn Ransom, Malouf Reveals the Deeper Truths That Make Us Fully Human.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomHow Does Malouf Make the Reader Aware of the Power of Words?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomRansom Demonstrates the Nothing Meaningful is Achieved Without Risk.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomAchilles’ Grief and Revenge Go Beyond What is Morally Acceptable. Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontOn the Waterfront Explores the Concept of Personal Redemption. Explain How This is Presented in the Film.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf Celebrates Simplicity and Truth in His Novel. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersIn ‘Year of Wonders’ it is the female characters who are the real heroes.The male characters are negative and destructive. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistIs Changez ‘Reluctant’ as the Title Suggests?
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘The novel reveals the consequences of deceit and betrayal.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontEdie is Depicted as an Angel That Saves Terry. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomWhat Seems Foolish is Just as Sensible Sometimes. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomRansom is a Novel That is Ultimately About the Indissoluble Ties of Family. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf’s Use of Language and Imagery in Ransom Shows Us the Value of Appreciating What is Around Us Every Day. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIt is the Style of the Novel Ransom Which Gives it Such Resonance. What Do You Think?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomBoth Priam and Achilles Are Liberated as a Result of What Priam Does. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomIn What Ways is Fate Central to the Text?
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistNarrative and Structure in The Reluctant Fundamentalist
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant Fundamentalist‘Changez’s narcissism means that he is divorced from reality.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Henry Lawson Short StoriesTo Know Ourselves We Need to Know Where We Have Come From.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Why should this good woman lie here, in such extremity, when a man like my father lived to waste his reason on drunkenness?’ There is little justice in ‘Year of Wonders’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersYear of Wonders Explores Human Failings in Times of Crisis. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesLahiri’s Stories Show the Importance of Communication in Relationships. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesIn Lahiri’s View, What Caused the Breaking Down of the Relationship in the Story?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘Twelve Angry Men’ vindicates rather than destroys our belief in the jury system as a means of securing justice. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenDoes It Matter That the Audience Remains Ignorant of the Defendant’s Innocence or Guilt at the End of the Play?
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethDiscuss the Relationship Between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.
English Previous Curriculum, Henry Lawson Short StoriesOur Identity is Shaped By How Others View Us.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the WoodsThe Text Suggests That There is No Final Truth, Only Conflicting Possibilities. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, MacbethLady Macbeth is the Real Villain of the Play.
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontTerry Gains More Than He Loses as a Result of His Actions in ‘On the Waterfront’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘The novel examines the human capacity for regeneration after catastrophic events.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiNowra’s Characters Are Products of Their Own Environment.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiWhat Does Lewis Learn About Love and Fidelity Through the Course of the Play? What Viewpoint Does Each of the Characters Hold in Regards to Love and Fidelity?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenTwelve Angry Men is a Warning of How Prejudice and Personal Preoccupations Can Undermine Our Responsibility to Our Fellow Man. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenDo the Jurors in ‘Twelve Angry Men’ Uphold Their Civic Duty as American Citizens?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenIn ‘Twelve Angry Men’, Rose Suggests That Prejudice Almost Always Shapes Our Interactions With and Judgement of Others.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘A Christmas Carol’ Demonstrates the Importance of Human Connections and Social Traditions in a Largely Bleak World.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolDicken’s Presents the Readre With Three Spirits Whose Identities Are Vastly Different But Whose Mission is the Same. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Henry Lawson Short StoriesIdentity is Never Static.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenReginald Rose Shows That Individual Motivations and Prejudices Make it Difficult to be Objective. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘In the Journey of Priam and Somax, Malouf Reveals the Deeper Truths That Make Us Fully Human.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘Our deepest sympathies in this novel lie with Kathy Wade.’ Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘John Wade’s actions in later life are shaped by the traumatic events of his childhood.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘John Wade was terrified of losing her, and always had been.’ How Does This Help You to Understand Wade’s Relationship with Kathy?
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the WoodsJohn and Kathy Wade Truly Love Each Other, Or Do They? Does the Narrative Suggest That Their Relationship is Built on Anything More Than Lies and Suspicion?
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘It wasn’t jus the war that made him what he was. That’s too easy. It was everything – his whole nature.’ What Has Made John Wade the Man He Is? Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘In the Lake of the Woods’ is About the Impossibility of Ever Knowing the Truth. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘In the Lake of the Woods’ Explores the Consequences When People Fail in their Moral Responsibilities.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘It is conscience that turns Terry Malloy against the Mob.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘Can We Believe That He Was Not a Monster But a Man?’ What is Your Answer to This Question About John Wade?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders’ Demonstrates the Sinister Side of Religious Fervour. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenIt is the Structure and the Language of the Play That Creates the Greatest Sense of the Experience. To What Extent Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenTwelve Angry Men Not Only Asserts That ‘Justice’ and ‘Truth’ Are Different, but Also That Justice is Far More Important Than the Truth. Do You Agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenThe Relationship Between the 3rd and 8th Jurors is the Most Important Element in ‘Twelve Angry Men’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenTwelve Angry Men is About the Impossibility of a Certainty. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love Stories‘The sentences sometimes make me forget the barbarity of man’. Is mankind truly depicted as barbaric in The Old Man Who Read Love Stories?
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love Stories‘It was a kiss to remember their lives by.’ The Old Man Who Read Love Stories demonstrates the importance of memories. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiNowra’s Play Cosi Passes Judgement On a Society That is Obsessed With Ideals. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘All is well that ends well.’ Cosi ends in success for everyone. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the WoodsThe Text Explores the Consequences of Trauma Through the Character of John Wade.
English Previous Curriculum, In the Lake of the Woods‘He’d tried to pull off a trick that couldn’t be done, which was to remake himself.’ Why Can’t John Wade ‘remake’ himself?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolHow does Dickens use the structure of A Christmas Carol to deliver his messages?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘My Dear Friends, soon God will set us a new test” Warns the Priest. The hardships of the plague bring out both the best and the worst in the town of Eyam.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘It’s simply love that changes Terry, not principles and regrets.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Reluctant FundamentalistThe tension in ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’ is created more through the writing techniques of Mohsin Hamid rather than the plot. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘The use of characters in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol is highly symbolic. Discuss.’
English Previous Curriculum, CosiWhat does Lewis learn by directing the play?
English Previous Curriculum, Life of Pi‘To what extent does Pi’s life before leaving India prepare him for his time in the lifeboat?’
English Previous Curriculum, CosiHow do the characters in ‘Cosi’ transform as a result of the play?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘It is not the 8th juror who has triumphed at the end of Rose’s drama, but the deliberation process itself.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘Through Twelve Angry Men, Rose shows that prejudice and apathy can undermine the jury system.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry Men‘Twelve Angry Men is ultimately a negative play. In what ways is this true?’
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love StoriesDespite his human failings, Antonio has an essential goodness that he does not even recognise himself, ‘because their thoughts are beautiful’. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Cosi‘Cosi is a play about having goals and achieving them, no matter who you are.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolA Christmas Carol establishes the Scrooge must relinquish his love of money in order to be redeemed. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolA Christmas Carol is a simple story of a man being reformed. To what extent do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontTerry is the true hero of ‘On the Waterfront’. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘This old fellow, like most storytellers, is a stealer of other men’s tales, of other men’s lives.’ How does ‘Ransom’ represent the value of telling stories?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘We had been stripped bare indeed.’ What vulnerabilities are exposed by the plague in Eyam?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of WondersAnna is so helpful to others and so willing to disclose unfavorable aspects of herself that she is a wholly reliable narrator of the text.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomDiscuss the significance of the relationship between Somax and Priam.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf presents the idea that it is the experience of life that that is more important than the final result. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomRansom suggests that we cannot predict who will teach us the most important lessons. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Twelve Angry MenHow does Reginald Rose construct a piece that is dramatic and engaging?
English Previous Curriculum, The Old Man Who Read Love Stories‘The fact that Antonio and Josefina live ‘happily ever after’ doesn’t change the fact that this story is essentially without hope.’ Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontCharley Malloy is just as heroic as his brother. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, On the WaterfrontIt is the style of ‘On the Waterfront’ that gives the film its power. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Ransom‘But the truth is, we don’t just lie down and die, do we, sir? We go on. For all our losses.’ In Ransom, Malouf makes us reconsider the notion of heroism. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, RansomMalouf’s novel demonstrates that even in the midst of war and brutality, it is essential to retain one’s humanity.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, CosiThe dramatic impact of Cosi stems from the stark contrast between comedy and tragedy.’ Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront’ is the story of Terry Malloy’s journey to self-respect.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas Carol‘A Christmas Carol’ demonstrates the importance of human connections and social traditions in a largely bleak world. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolDiscuss the role of Marley and the three spirits in helping to reform Ebenezer Scrooge.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolWhat are the roles of the minor characters Mr Fezziwig, Fred, Tim and Bob Cratchit in the story?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolIt is through understanding others that Ebenezer Scrooge begins to understand himself. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Macbeth‘O full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!’ Is Macbeth mad?
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolHow is Dickens’ concern for the poor evident in ‘A Christmas Carol’?
English Previous Curriculum, Year of Wonders‘Year of Wonders’ shows that while the plague brings adversity, it can also bring about a new awareness of what is important in life.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of MaladiesIn seeking to improve their lives, some of the characters in the stories lose sight of what they truly value. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘Loneliness and alienation pervade the lives of many characters in these short stories. Do any of the characters find a way out of this misery?’
English Previous Curriculum, Interpreter of Maladies‘To belong is to be happy. How does Lahiri support or contradict this idea in her stories?’
English Previous Curriculum, RansomAchilles’ grief and revenge go beyond what is morally acceptable. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, RansomBoth Priam and Achilles are liberated as a result of what Priam does. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, On the Waterfront‘On the Waterfront’ explores the relationship between characters.
English Previous Curriculum, A Christmas CarolHow is Dickens’ concern for the poor evident in ‘A Christmas Carol’?



List 2 Texts – Current – Encountering Conflict

SubjectTitle
English Year 12, Life of GalileoOne’s True Self is Revealed During Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict Leads Individuals to Discover More About Themselves and Others.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoPeople These Days Handle Conflict Better Than They Used To.
English Year 12, Life of Galileo
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict is Driven by Self Interest.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoPower Imbalances Will Inevitably Produce Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict occurs when people take a stand.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoPeople’s reaction to conflict is determined by self-interest.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe truth will set you free.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe Ability to Compromise is Important When Responding to Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict Enables One to See Clearly.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoIt is the Victims of Conflict Who Show Us What is Really Important.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict is About Right and Wrong.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict Involves a Clash or Ideas, Interests and Expectations.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoIn Conflict, Emotion Usually Overrides Reason.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoIt is Difficult to Remain a Bystander in Any Situation of Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoProgress Invites Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflicts from history teach us many things about ourselves and the times in which we live.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoIt is Difficult to Remain a Bystander in Any Situation of Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflicts From History Teach Us a Lot About Ourself and the World Around Us.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoWe Need Some Degree of Conflict and Tension If We Are to Experience the Richness of Being Fully Alive.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict Can Occur Due to Misunderstandings.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe Choices We Make Under Pressure Can Show Us What We Truly Value.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoLetter to VCAA
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe Little Monk Confesses His Doubts to the Priest.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe Experience of Conflict Changes People’s Priorities.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe Victims of Conflict Show Us What is Really Important.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoIn Times of Conflict, No One is Completely Innocent.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict Diminishes as Understanding Increases.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict Can Reveal Unexpected Qualities in an Individual.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoWhen We Encounter Conflict, We Encounter Suffering.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoA Conflict Arises Due to Many Different Causes.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoAnyone Taking Part in a Conflict Discovers Strength and Weaknesses They Never Knew They Had.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict is often initiated by the unfamiliar.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoWhen We Avoid Conflict, We Betray Ourselves.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoSaying Sorry Will Not in Itself Resolve Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict triggers social progress.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe Experience of Conflict Changes People’s Priorities.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoCompromise Does Not Resolve Conflict, It Merely Defers It.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoComplex Problems Involve Complex Solutions.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict is born of fear.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoOur Beliefs and Values Can Change Because of Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe choices we make under pressure can show us what we truly value.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict is a catalyst for change.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict will always occur because people see the world differently.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoAn Individual’s Understanding of the World Will Be Central to How They Respond to Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict occurs due to a clash of beliefs.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoWho we are is truly tested when we encounter conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict is inevitable in a society where individuals are forced to conform.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoWho We Are is Truly Tested When We Encounter Conflict.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict is Never Fair.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict is a catalyst for change.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict Can Occur Due to Misunderstandings.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoThe choices we make under pressure can show us what we truly value.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoConflict Occurs Due to a Clash of Beliefs.
English Year 12, Life of GalileoOne’s weaknesses are revealed during conflict.



List 2 Texts – Current – Identity & Belonging

SubjectTitle
English Year 12, Skinit is dangerous to be different to the rest of the society
English Year 12, SkinMore than anything else, belonging is about finding a place for ourselves in the world.
English Year 12, SkinIt is difficult to possess a sense of belonging when we are unsure of our own identity
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth Doll‘The function of Australian Drama has always been the development of a unique Australian identity.’ Discuss this statement with references to ‘Summer of the Seventeenth Doll’.
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth DollA person’s sense of individual identity is always changing in response to their experiences of life.
English Year 12, SkinEach person has different identities for different relationships and situations.
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth DollIt Truly is Difficult to be Different.
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth DollHow do aging and the passage of time affect our perception of who we really are?
English Year 12, Skin‘Others see us differently to how we see ourselves.’
English Year 12, SkinI awoke in the morning expecting my mother’s delicious breakfast; however, to my dismay I did not find my mother
English Year 12, SkinOur relationships with others help us to define who we are.
English Year 12, SkinSometimes you know that you should belong, but you don’t feel like you do.
English Year 12, SkinOur relationships help strengthen our identity.
English Year 12, SkinDescribe the role of race in Skin and how it influence Sandra’s sense of identity.
English Year 12, SkinEach person has different identities for different relationships and situations.
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth DollSometimes it is hard to balance a sense of belonging to a group with keeping one’s individual identity.
English Year 12, SkinFitting in requires the denial of one’s true self. Context, Growing Up Asian In Australia
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth DollAt times of change we experience the biggest impact to our sense of identity and belonging.
English Year 12, SkinThe First Group We Belong to, the Family, Has More Influence Than Any Other Group on Forming our Identity.
English Year 12, SkinHow Do Childhood Experiences Shape Our Lives As Adults?
English Year 12, SkinTo truly belong, there must be common ground between the individual and the group. Context, Skin
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth DollPride can destroy or enhance our journey in life.
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth DollBelonging requires us to forfeit our individualities.
English Year 12, Summer of the Seventeenth DollTo conform to the expectations of others may distort our sense of identity.



List 2 Texts – Current – The Imaginative Landscape

SubjectTitle
English Year 12, Peripheral Light – Selected and New PoemsMining and Lawson – Subjectivity and Imagination
English Year 12, Peripheral Light – Selected and New PoemsWe Relate to Landscape Through Memory and Emotion.
English Year 12, Peripheral Light – Selected and New PoemsThe Ways in Which We Understand a Landscape and Respond to it Can Change Over Time.
English Year 12, Peripheral Light – Selected and New PoemsThe place in which we live has an impact upon our understanding of the world.
English Year 12, Peripheral Light – Selected and New PoemsThe place in which we live has an impact upon our understanding of the world.
English Year 12, The View from Castle RockMemories of Childhood Are Intrinsically Linked to Landscape.
English Year 12, The View from Castle RockNo One Experiences the Landscape In Exactly the Same Way.
English Year 12, The View from Castle RockA Letter Home
English Year 12, The View from Castle RockIt Can Be Difficult to Accept Changes That Occur to a Familiar Landscape.
English Year 12, Peripheral Light – Selected and New PoemsThe Personal Landsape Reflects Individual Experience.
English Year 12, Peripheral Light – Selected and New PoemsOur Life Experiences Shape Our Connections to the Landscape.
English Year 12, Peripheral Light – Selected and New PoemsConfabulation and Suppression – Memories and Landscape



List 2 Texts – Current – Whose Reality

SubjectTitle
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsReality depends entirely on the individual and the context they find themselves in
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsIt takes courage to defend our view in the world
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsOur perceptions are shaped by the world we live in
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsWhen We Comprehend a Piece of Artwork, We Comprehend Ourselves.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘The line between illusion and madness is a fine one.’
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIt is Often Tempting, But Always Dangerous, to Seek to Avoid Reality.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanWe Can Evade Reality, But We Cannot Avoid the Consequences of Doing So.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanOur Lives Are Determined By Our Dreams.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanMemory is Intrinsically Connected to Reality.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanThe Persistance of Memory Can Dominate Present.
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsIt takes courage to defend our view in the world – Swimming Alone
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanText Focus: Death of a Salesman
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsOur perceptions are shaped by the world we live in
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIt is Often Tempting, But Dangerous, to Seek to Avoid Reality.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘Believing is seeing. The reality that we perceive is the reality that we want to perceive.’
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanEvery Reality is Open to Interpretation.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanWe Cannot Be Forced to Confront Reality, We Must Be Willing To.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘A memory is equal parts fact and self-deception.’
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanOur perspective is always subjective.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘Humanity needs a sense of wonder to cope with reality’.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIt is easier remaining in a world of illusion than it is to face reality.
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsAn experience becomes real when others feel what it felt like for you
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘Every reality is open to interpretation.’
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanReality is what we want to see not what we have to see.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘We cannot escape the realities that others create’.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘Reality is what surrounds us’.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIn the End Reality is a Matter of Choice.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘Our sanity depends on a clear understanding of what is and isn’t real.’
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIllusion Protects Us From Life’s Harsh Reality.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanWithout Illusion, Reality is Too Difficult to Confront.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanSometimes People Find Themselves Living in a Reality Created By Others.
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsOur reality is based on the people and experiences we encounter.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanEveryone Has Their Own View of Reality But in the End We Must All Face the Truth.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIt is Easier to Remain Happy in a World of Illusion Than it is to Face Reality.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘Our reality is not our own, but influenced by others.’
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanWe Believe What Those Who Are More Powerful Tell Us to Believe.
English Year 12, The Lot: In Words‘People’s memories shape their understanding of themselves, their world and others.’
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIt is Harder to Accept Reality Than Live in Illusion.
English Year 12, The Lot: In WordsOne Person is Capable of Shaping Reality For Many.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanOur View and Interpretation of Reality Has Profound Consequences For Us and People Close to Us.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanDreams and Reality Don’t Always Coincide.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanThe Dangers of Avoiding Reality
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIt is Ourselves and Our Experiences That Dictate Reality.
English Year 12, Death of a Salesman‘Death of a Salesman’ Quote Analysis
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanThe Truth About the Past is Always Open to Question.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanIt is Often Tempting, But Always Dangerous, to Seek to Avoid Reality.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanWe Create Illusions in Order to Cope With Reality.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanOur Reality is Shaped by the Experiences We Have.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanOur Fantasies Are More Powerful Than Our Reality.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanMany Factors Influence One’s View of the World.
English Year 12, Death of a SalesmanDeceiving ourselves about the nature of the world is often easier than deceiving others.



List 2 Texts – Previous – Encountering Conflict

SubjectTitle
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict is exacerbated when people do not communicate. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif‘In the presence of conflict, people’s decisions more often reveal the worst sides of human nature, not the best’
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanThere are many different types of conflict and conflict is rarely resolved
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘A person’s true character is revealed during conflict’.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict is a Catalyst For Change.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanThe Choices We Make Under Pressure Can Show Us What We Truly Value.
English Previous Curriculum, OmaghThe ghosts of Omagh- Creative
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleSurvival and self interest are often at the heart of conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverYes, we do all encounter conflict; with an ineffective resolution, the effects will continue long after the incident
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict can have an enourmous impact on those both directly and indirectly involced
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict Stems From Fear.
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Only those who are resilient can hope to survive an encounter with conflict.’
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIn Conflict, Our Emotions Exceed Our Reasoning.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘Conflict brings out the best and the worst in humanity.’
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleConflict challenge individuals to discover their strengths and their personal flaws
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIn Times of Conflict, Some Stresses Are Too Difficult to Overcome.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise Road‘Without conflict, there is no progress or change.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Conflict occurs between the powerful and the powerless.’
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadVictims of Conflict Can Often Be the Most Powerful
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThose affected by conflict show us what really matters
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘People’s responses to conflict are predominantly based on self-interest’.
English Previous Curriculum, The CruciblePeople are changed by experiences of conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflicts are an inevitable part of life
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverIn the middle of difficulty lies opportunity-Growth can come from conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleDuring conflict the group becomes more important than the individual
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict occurs as a result of competing interests
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘Conflict always involves choice.’
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleA conflict’s importance lies not in its causes but in its consequences.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThose affected by conflict show us what really matters
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘In any conflict, only the strong survive’
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict Has the Ability to Bring People Together Towards Resolution
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict is exacerbated when people do not communicate. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘It is the encounter with conflict that brings out either courage or cowardice in a character.’
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleCharacter Study – Abigail Williams
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanAs conflict intensifies, so does the pressure to become involved
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadAn Individual’s True Character is Shown in Times of Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘Encountering conflict will inevitably bring an individual to face moral issues.’
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleRepression causes conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflicts based on entrenched beliefs are difficult to overcome.
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverSurvivors of conflict are forever affected by their experiences
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleIn times of conflict, corrupt systems can only be tolerated for so long.In times of conflict, corrupt systems can only be tolerated for so long
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleIn times of conflict ordinary people can act in extraordinary ways
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleAt the heart of conflict is fear
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe Experience of Conflict Changes People’s Priorities.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleWhen encountering conflict, individuals must think carefully about how they choose to act
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Conflict exposes the best and worst in people.’ Explore this statement in light of your study of the crucible and your view of the world.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleIgnorance is at the heart of conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanGraham Greene’s The Quiet American explores the concept that the ends justify the means. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘I wish sometimes you had a few bad motives; you might understand a little more about human beings.’ Describe Fowler’s assessment of Pyle.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘The Quiet American’ demonstrates that in dangerous times the powerful will sacrifice the powerless to advance their own causes. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanThe dual motifs of the view from the tower and the view from the ground- the distant and the close-up- are central to the novel. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘The way in which we respond to conflict reveals our true character’
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanIn Order to Understand Events Clearly We Must Observe Them at Close Range. How Far Does The Quiet American Show This to be True?
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict can reveal unexpected qualities in an individual
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleCreative Piece
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleExpository Piece
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Real conflicts do not offer easy resolutions or neat closure.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifPeople and society are changed by experiences of conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict can reveal the best and worst in humanity. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverCreative piece based on ‘The Secret River’: ‘Violent conflict is generally caused by ignorance and fear.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict can have an enormous impact on those both directly and indirectly involved
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict can have lasting effects on those involved
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleConflicts often prompt people to take the expedient rather than the moral cause of action
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverThere are no rules for who will survive conflict and who would be destroyed by it
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverIt is through conflict that we grow
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverEncountering Conflict Arise from miscommunication
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanWe are defined by the choices we make when we encounter conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverEncounters from conflict arise from miscommunication – Persuasive Context
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadAlthough Conflict May Be Caused By a Single Spark, Its Effects May Be Widespread.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleConflict hurts the innocent above all else
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadNothing is Gained By Avoiding Conflict; It Must Be Confronted.
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict involves a clash of ideas
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadWho We Are is Truly Tested and Proven When We Encounter Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThere Are Few Winners In Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe Victims of Conflict Show Us What is Really Important.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe Survivors of Conflict Are True Heroes.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIt is the Victims of Conflict Who Show Us What is Really Important.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe Ability to Compromise is Important When Responding to Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict Cannot Be Resolved With Violence.
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Conflict is inevitable, but its outcomes are determined by the choices of those involved’
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIt is Better to Engage in Conflict Than it is to Avoid It.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIt is Difficult to Remain a Bystander When Responding to Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIn Time of Conflict, People Care More About Themselves Than Anything Or Anyone Else.
English Previous Curriculum, The CruciblePride is often a barrier to resolving conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleWhat is lost when conflict occurs
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe Experience of Conflict Changes People’s Priorities.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThe clash between reason and emotion lies behind many conflicts.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadOur Paradise Road
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleConflict can unify and divide those who encounter it. Discuss
English Previous Curriculum, The CruciblePeople’s responses to conflict are based more on self-interest than any other factor
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘A conflict’s importance lies not in its causes but in its consequences.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifEvery conflict involves both an internal and an external struggle
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanSacrifice is often necessary to resolve conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleWhy conflict happens is less important than how it affects people
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleAt the heart of conflict is fear.
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘There is a reason for everything and a reason for every activity under Heaven’
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThe importance of conflict lies not in its causes but its consequences.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict can result in a positive outcome
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanIt is impossible to remain objective in situations of conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict leads to deep self understanding
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadEncountering conflict changes both those in power and those without power.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleHang Your Heads – Creative
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘The strength of someone is shown in times of conflict’
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleDoes Hale’s view in The Crucible change? Explain.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadLife is Rarely Without Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadEncountering conflict changes both those in power and those without power.
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Fear is the prime instigator of conflict’ with Statement of Intention
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘There are many different types of conflict and conflict is rarely resolved’ with Statement of Intention
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifIn the midst of conflict, peace is still possible.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleIt is the way in which conflict is managed that determines its effects on those involved.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanThe Quiet American Shows That To Remain Detached Is Ultimately Impossible
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict is Born of Prejudice.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadStaying True to Core Values Best Way Deal With Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleEncountering conflict is unavoidable. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThe Crucible is a warning about what?
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleWhat is lost when conflict occurs?
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe victims of conflict show us what is really important.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadSurviving Conflict Requires Compromise.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleFear is the prime instigator of conflict
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadSometimes conflict promotes deeper human connections as much as it undermines them.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifThe Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif- ‘It is Najaf’s faith that enables him to remain resilient. Discuss’
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIn times of conflict ordinary people can act in extrordinary ways.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifLiving and Surviving: Afghan Citizens and The Taliban
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif‘In times of conflict people care more about themselves than anything or anyone.’
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadAn Individual’s Good and Bad Side is Exposed When Faced With Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict Reveals the Truth About Human Character.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict is Bound to Happen When Emotion Rules Reason.
English Previous Curriculum, OmaghThe effects of conflict are so damaging that we must place importance upon and attempt to prevent the cause
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American: Nothing is gained by avoiding conflict
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict is Inevitable.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanThe Experience of Conflict Changes People’s Priorities.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict Brings Out the Best and Worst in Humanity.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadGrowth can come from conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict only has a negative effect on people.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadHumanity seems to be programed for conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifWe are never without hope even in the most difficult conflicts
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleDear Diary
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleConflict is often a struggle between the powerful and the powerless
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifNew or Challenging Ideas Inevitably Encounter Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict Causes Both Healing and Harm. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIndividuals Will Always Respond Differently to Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanDesire, loss and loathing are central to all dissension
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifSurviving conflict makes us stronger people.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifIt is the victims of conflict who show us what is really important.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict Changes People for the Better.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleWhen faced with conflict some will abandon individual needs to act for the common good. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleSurvivors of conflict are forever shaped by their experiences. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifDifficulties are meant to rouse, not discourage. The human spirit is to grow strong by conflict. ‘Conflict can make us better people.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanWe Can Never Avoid Conflict, We Have to Face it in One Way or Another.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict results from a struggle to maintain or gain power
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict can reveal the best and worst of humanity
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict is unavoidable
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict is Necessary For Change to Take Place.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict Can Force People to Act in Unexpected ways.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIt is possible to resolve conflict, we choose not to do so.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleConflict reveals the character of humanity
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe ability to compromise when responding to conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanOur Identity is Formed By the Values of Our Community.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe Way in Which We Respond to Conflict Determines if it Can be Resolved.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifIt is Difficult to Remain a Bystander in Any Situation of Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanIt is important to take a side in any conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanIt is difficult to remain a bystander in any situation of conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanIn Conflict, Our Emotions Exceed Our Reasoning.
English Previous Curriculum, OmaghIs it possible to live in a society without conflict?
English Previous Curriculum, OmaghExpository with three texts- The Crucible, Omagh and Secret River
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict is a Fear of Difference.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanIndividual desires often exacerbate conflict
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadNothing Good Can Come From Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict is pervasive in nature, thus ordinary people are not immune
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanA Conflict Arises Due to Many Different Causes.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict is Driven by Self-Interest.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanIn Times of Crisis, Tolerance and Compassion Are Invaluable Traits.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadFear of what is different lies at the root of conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict begins at home and escalates from there
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanThose who initiate conflict are often destroyed by their own actions
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American: An ‘encounter with conflict’ often has unexpected consequences.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadOur Response to Conflict is Shaped By Our Beliefs and Values.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict can be destructive and constructive.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif‘In times of conflict, ordinary people can act in extraordinary ways.’
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleSocial order can deteriorate into conflict and anarchy with disturbing ease
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Some stresses are too difficult to overcome’
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Conflict can force people to act in unexpected ways’
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif‘Who we is truly tested and proven when we encounter conflict.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverConflict brings out the best and worst in human nature
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise Road‘Conflict has only negative effects on people’
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif‘Conflict changes both those with power and those without it’
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanThe importance of a conflict lies not in its causes but in its consequences
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadWhen Conflict Arises it is Impossible Not to Take a Side. Everyone Has a Role to Play.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadNothing good ever comes out of conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverNational identity is born out of conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanAll of us have some responsibility when we encounter conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, OmaghThe search for truth and justice by individuals can conflict with goals of government and the authorities
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadSurvivors of Conflict Are Forever Shaped By Their Experiences.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThe potential for conflict is in all human beings
English Previous Curriculum, OmaghThe Journey for justice – Creative Omagh
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThose who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanWithout disagreement there can never be reconciliation
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘The consequences of conflict are often tragic and life changing’
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIt is Evident That Groups Unite to Overcome the Harshness of Tragedy.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadTime and Time Again, the Human Spirit Soars Above the Tragedy and Destruction of Conflicts.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifWe are Constantly Encountering Adversity.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanIt is difficult to remail a bystander in any situation of conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict isn’t just born out of hatred, it is born out of love
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifThe ability to compromise is important when responding to conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifNone of the characters in these stories are at peace
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif‘Conflict is created when we are faced with the unfamiliar’
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadA Conflict’s Importance Lies Not in its Causes But in its Consequences.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict is Born of Fear.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadPeople Commit Atrocities Because of a Shift in Their Mindset of What is Acceptable.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict is a Destructive Force in Our Lives.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifThe Experience of Conflict Changes People’s Priorities.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifIt is Difficult to Remain a Bystander in Any Situation of Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleAre you your true-self when in conflict?
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict can only be resolved through dispelling ignorance
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadPower Imbalances Will Inevitably Produce Conflict.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadIt is Possible to Resolve Conflict, But Sometimes We Choose Not To.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifOur responses to conflict define who we are as people.
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifWritten Explanation – ‘Conflict is created when we are faced with the unfamiliar
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleResponses to conflict are primarily motivated by self interest.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThe initial response to conflict has important influence on the outcome
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflict is perpetuated by our pursuit of individual values and desires
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverIn encountering conflict an individual inevitably reassess that their values
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-Sharif‘Conflict can have tragic consequences for ordinary people.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict is a Destructive Force in Our Lives.
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘Individuals never know who they truly are until tested by conflict’
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadFear drives all reactions to conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The Crucible‘In times of conflict, ordinary people find themselves capable of great things.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Rugmaker of Mazar-e-SharifConflict cannot be resolved without violence
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict can force people to act in unexpected ways
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadThe impact of conflict is not always persuasive
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverIndividuals will always respond differently to conflicts
English Previous Curriculum, The Secret RiverDesire to control the emotion and needs of others often leads to conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleConflict is a web that ensnares many
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadNobody is completely innocent in a situation of conflict
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleWe are never without hope even in the most difficult conflicts
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict is an Ever-Present and Ongoing Aspect of Our Lives.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleIt is difficult to remain a bystander in any conflict situation
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American‘conflict within oneself is the most difficult kind to deal with’
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleCrucible Notes
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleConflict can have an enormous impact on those both directly and indirectly involved
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleIt is the victims of conflict who show us what is really important
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet AmericanConflicts Reveal the Truth About Human Character.
English Previous Curriculum, Paradise RoadConflict is Inevitable.
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThe clash between reason and emotion lies behind many conflicts
English Previous Curriculum, The CrucibleThe resolution of conflict is more important than the conflict itself.
English Previous Curriculum, The Quiet American-’It is difficult to remain a bystander in any situation or conflict’



List 2 Texts – Previous – Identity & Belonging

SubjectTitle
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeWe cannot know ourselves fully without connecting to others
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes GladnessWithout close and supportive relationships, we can often feel isolated
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeIt is through our relationship with others that we come to know ourselves
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeSometimes it’s hard to balance belonging to a group with keeping ones identity
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeThe individual’s greatest challenge is to be true to oneself despite external pressures
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeOur connections with those around us make us who we are
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessIt is difficult to balance individuality with belonging to a group
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyePeople without groups to belong to can be vulnerable in many ways
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessIndividuals are inevitably shaped by the culture they belong to
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaSometimes Belonging Can Matter More to us Than Our Identity.
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeThe individuals’ greatest challenge is to be true to oneself despite external pressures.
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessOur relationships with others help us define who we are
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessSometimes it is hard to balance belonging to a group with keeping your individual identity.
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessThere are consequences for the individual in belonging to a group
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessIdentity and a sense of self are not fixed we continue to discover and remake who we are.
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes GladnessIt is not possible to have a strong sense of identity and isolation
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeEstablishing and maintaining identity means coming to terms with the groups we belong to.
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessWe cannot achieve a strong sense of identity unless we also have a strong sense of belonging outside ourselves.
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessIt is sometimes hard to know what other people are really like under their masks
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes GladnessFeelings of acceptance result in a positive view of life
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessAn individual who does not belong to a large group cannot experience true happiness
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes GladnessWe cannot achieve a strong sense of identity unless we have a strong sense of belonging to something other than ourselves
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaTo Conform to the Expectations of Others May Be Very Destructive For the Individual.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaThere Are Costs to the Individual in Belonging to a Group.
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the Wedding‘It is frequently true that others can have greater insight and knowledge about our own identity’.
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingPeople Seek A Sense of Belonging Through Their Bonds With Others.
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes GladnessHaving a sense of being different makes it difficult to belong
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingThe turbulence and confusions of adolescence can leave an enduring mark on one’s identity
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingAdolescence is a story of woe and frustration.
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingA solitary life is an unfulfilling life.
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes GladnessTo belong to a group does not necessarily mean you identify with it.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaIdentity is not fixed; it changes according to our audience.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaOur Relationships With Others Help Us to Define Who We Are.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaTo Conform to the Expectations of Others May Be Destructive for the Individual
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingHaving a Sense of Being Different Makes it Difficult to Belong.
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeWhat Matters Most is How You See Yourself.
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeWe Wear Masks to Hide Our Identity.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaTall Poppy Syndrome
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaWe do not have a single identity, we have multiple identities that are contuinually evolving
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes GladnessIt is difficult to maintain a strong sense of identity in our societySTRONG SENSE OF IDENTITY IN OUR SOCIETY
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingBeing an outsider has a greater effect on our identity than belonging
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes GladnessIf we are not true to ourselves we can never feel completely content
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaSometime’s others know us better than ourselves
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingAdversity can impact both our identity and sense of belonging.
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes Gladness‘An individual’s identity is influenced by many different factors.’ Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes Gladness‘One’s true self is revealed in the company one keeps.’
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes Gladness‘A solitary life is an unfulfilling life’
English Previous Curriculum, Sometimes Gladness‘Individuals make personal sacrifices and compromises in order to belong.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeHolden Caulfield appears to be escaping his life. Why and how? Is he successful or not?
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the Rye‘The Catcher in the Rye’ informs and entertains the reader. Do you agree?
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaBelonging is When People Accept You For Who You Are.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaDiscuss some of the challenges that migrants /the children of migrants may face in Australia. Refer to at least two stories from Growing up Asian in Australia.
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingThe groups we reject show us who we are just as much as the groups we choose to join.
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingChange threatens individuality.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaMichael Jackson Obituary: Child Star, King of Pop, Wacko or just the Man in the Mirror?
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingChange threatens individuality.
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the WeddingSometimes we only come to understand who we really are as a result of rejection.
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessWithout connection to others there is no me.
English Previous Curriculum, WitnessBelonging can be both fulfilling and difficult.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaTo Conform to the Expectations of Others May be Self-Destructive For the Individual.
English Previous Curriculum, The Member of the Wedding‘To question where we belong is to question our identity’
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaIndividuality is not necessarily denied to a person who identifies with and belongs to a group.
English Previous Curriculum, Witness‘A strong sense of belonging to a person, group or society is always desirable.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeRelationships are an important part in forming identity
English Previous Curriculum, Witness‘The Catcher in the Rye’ Creative Piece and ‘Witness’ Expositive
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaA community’s true values are revealed through its treatment of those who do not belong.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaOur appearance can be an important factor in developing a sense of our own identity.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaFive Universal Truths about Your Nonni
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaMy friends like to constantly remark that I’m not Asian.
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the Rye‘As we journey through life, identity and belonging must be constantly renegotiated.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeTo be true to yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest achievement.
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in AustraliaIt Can Be Hard to Establish Your Identity When You Feel Different From Those Around You.
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the RyeThere are costs to the individual in belonging to a group
English Previous Curriculum, Growing Up Asian in Australia‘Our national identity is revealed in many ways.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Catcher in the Rye‘The way in which a person matures is influenced by the actions of others.’



List 2 Texts – Previous – The Imaginative Landscape

SubjectTitle
English Previous Curriculum, IslandNew landscapes challenge our sense of identity
English Previous Curriculum, One Night the MoonLandscapes Are Not Neutral, Static Spaces. We Are Able to Transform Them in Our Minds.
English Previous Curriculum, Tirra Lirra by the RiverThe Landscape Provides a Sense of Community and Belonging.
English Previous Curriculum, Tirra Lirra by the RiverOur First Remembered Landscape Tell Us Who We Are.
English Previous Curriculum, Tirra Lirra by the RiverAcknowledging the Legitimacy of Certain Landscapes Can Represent Chaos For Those With Power.
English Previous Curriculum, IslandThe impact of the landscape on humans
English Previous Curriculum, The Poetry of Robert FrostThe Fear of God
English Previous Curriculum, The Poetry of Robert FrostUse Frost’s metaphor of ‘paths’ as inspiration for a piece of writing about the landscape of your life
English Previous Curriculum, IslandThe memories of a landscape stay with us forever.
English Previous Curriculum, One Night the MoonWe can never truly control our surrounding
English Previous Curriculum, One Night the MoonThe imagination’s interaction with the landscape reveals important truths about human behaviour
English Previous Curriculum, The Poetry of Robert FrostCreative Piece
English Previous Curriculum, IslandOur life experiences shape our connections to the landscape.
English Previous Curriculum, IslandThe way we view the landscape we live in reflects our hopes and fears.
English Previous Curriculum, IslandLandscapes have the capacity to shape us profoundly.
English Previous Curriculum, IslandA landscape in turmoil presents new pathways for the human spirit.
English Previous Curriculum, IslandPersuasive speech
English Previous Curriculum, IslandWriting in Context – Creative Writing Piece: ‘Island’
English Previous Curriculum, IslandThe landscape is never neutral.
English Previous Curriculum, Island‘Our sense of self is determined by the landscapes we encounter.’
English Previous Curriculum, Island‘The landscape provides a sense of community and belonging.’
English Previous Curriculum, IslandHuman impact on landscape is always fleeting.
English Previous Curriculum, IslandThere is never an obvious direction to overcome the landscapes we encounter.
English Previous Curriculum, IslandLandscapes are canvases to be transformed
English Previous Curriculum, IslandLandscapes are canvases to be transformed – Essay 2
English Previous Curriculum, One Night the MoonOur Inner Landscape Shapes Our Perception and Interaction With Outer Landscape.
English Previous Curriculum, The Poetry of Robert FrostThe Poetry of Robert Frost: Landscapes Inspire Discovery
English Previous Curriculum, The Poetry of Robert FrostThe transformative power of the imaginative landscape has the power to shape lies. (Island and Robert Frost Poetry)
English Previous Curriculum, One Night the MoonBuilding and Establishing Networks



List 2 Texts – Previous – Whose Reality

SubjectTitle
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireFantasy is legitimare and useful means of surviving harsh circumstances
English Previous Curriculum, The Shark NetWe can evade reality but we cannot avoid the consequences of doing so.
English Previous Curriculum, Enduring LoveThe way people perceive reality is shaped by those around them
English Previous Curriculum, The PlayerWe adjust our behavior and beliefs to fit the reality we are presented with.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireNo two people can ever share the same reality
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesReality Defies the Tangible and Involves All Kinds of Assumptions and Interpretations.
English Previous Curriculum, Enduring LoveWe are all susceptible to delusions
English Previous Curriculum, Enduring LoveMemories can never provide a reliable version of reality
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireEveryone constructs their own reality.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesWhat we want to believe is what we choose to see.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesirePersuasive piece Outcome 3
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named Desire‘Differing realities can lead to conflict and tragedy.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Shark NetThere are no facts, only interpretation
English Previous Curriculum, The Shark NetWhat remains hidden, rather than what we share, often defines our reality
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireFantasy is a legitimate and useful means of surviving harsh circumstances
English Previous Curriculum, The Shark NetWrites a series of diary entries in the voice of Eric Cooke, recorded during the period of time in which the murders were committed.
English Previous Curriculum, The Player‘We can never attain a fully objective view of reality because we remain trapped in the prison of our subjectivity.’
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireOnes fantasy is never enough to overcome reality
English Previous Curriculum, Spies‘People’s memories shape their understanding of themselves, their world and others.’
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireAccepting the reality of others is easier than accepting our own.
English Previous Curriculum, The Shark NetMoney’s influence on reality
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesMemory but not as we know it.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesirePeople’s strengths lie in their ability to transcend reality through fantasy
English Previous Curriculum, The Shark NetReality can exist both internally and externally, and often the difference between the two is startling.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireContext Piece – Dear Dad
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireOne person’s sense of reality does not determine another’s sense of reality
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireIn any conflict only the strong survive
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireOur Experiences Prevent Us Seeing The Truth
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesIllusion is more attractive than reality.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireStudy notes for Street Car Named Desire
English Previous Curriculum, Spies‘There are many ways of viewing a situation or event’.
English Previous Curriculum, The PlayerEveryone Constructs Their Own Reality.
English Previous Curriculum, Spies‘Through our imaginations, we can experience different worlds.’
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named Desire‘Reality can be a crushing burden to bear’
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named Desire‘The line between illusion and madness is a fine one.’
English Previous Curriculum, The PlayerOne Person is Capable of Shaping reality For Many.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesImagination, As Much As Facts, Shape Our Understanding Of Reality.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireWe can evade ‘reality’ but we cannot avoid the consequences of doing so.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesSometimes people find themselves living in a world created by other people.
English Previous Curriculum, Spies‘Shared experience does not mean that people see things the same way’
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesOur Senses Are Unable to Tell Us Everything We Need to Know About Reality.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named Desire‘We an evade ‘reality’ but we cannot avoid the consequences of doing so.’
English Previous Curriculum, The Shark NetWe do not see things as they are. We see them as we are.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesOur Perception of Reality is Limited By Who We Are.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireShared experience does not mean that people see things the same way.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesOur sanity depends on a clear understanding of what is and isn’t real
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesContext SAC Essay
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireReality is in the eye of the beholder
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesUnderstandiing What is Real and What is Not is Never Easy.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesReality is Beyond the Understanding of Mere Humans.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesEvery Reality is Open to Interpretation
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesReality is Beyond the Understanding of Mere Humans.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesWe Influence Our Own Reality
English Previous Curriculum, Spies‘Reality defies the tangible and involves all kinds of assumptions and interpretations’. Discuss.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named Desire‘Not accepting the reality of others can have serious consequences.”When competing realities clash, the result can only be tragedy.”Differing perceptions of reality can cause conflict and suffering.
English Previous Curriculum, Enduring LoveOne person’s reality can make a perfect sense to them, but little sense to anyone else
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireEvading reality to cope with the past can be a useful tool
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireIndividual Perceptions
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesirePowerful declaration of fantasy
English Previous Curriculum, The Shark NetObjective reality
English Previous Curriculum, Enduring LoveWe can never be sure we share the same understanding of truth
English Previous Curriculum, Spies‘Our sense of reality is in a state of constant flux’
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesOnly through multiple perspectives can we understand reality
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named Desire‘Human kind cannot bear very much reality’
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesWe Can Never Attain a Fully Objective View of Reality Because We Remain Trapped in the Prison of Our Subjectivity.
English Previous Curriculum, The PlayerDon’t Blame Hollywood.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named Desire‘Sometimes people find themselves living in a world created by other people’
English Previous Curriculum, The PlayerMany Factors Influence One’s View of the World.
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireAvoiding reality, dreams, desires
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named Desire‘We decide what reality is according to the outcomes we want from it’.
English Previous Curriculum, Spies‘Sooner or later one needs to choose a side in a time of crisis.’ Discuss the principles of choosing a side.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesWe create reality through our experiences and our imagination.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesOur View of the World Depends on Who We Are and Where We Come From.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesIllusion is often more attractive than reality
English Previous Curriculum, Spies‘How we see the world is determined by our environment.’
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesA Child’s Reality and An Adult’s Reality Are Two Very Different Things.
English Previous Curriculum, SpiesMemory is Part Fact, Part Self-Deception.
English Previous Curriculum, Enduring LoveEnduring Love study notes
English Previous Curriculum, A Street Car Named DesireIt is harder to accept reality that to live in an illusion.